Arlington

Cowboys-Patriots postgame brawl leaves one fan shot, another in custody

Arlington police give details of AT&T Stadium shooting

Arlington police spokesman Lt. Chris Cook describes the fight and shooting after the Dallas Cowboys-New England Patriots game at AT&T Stadium on Oct. 11.
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Arlington police spokesman Lt. Chris Cook describes the fight and shooting after the Dallas Cowboys-New England Patriots game at AT&T Stadium on Oct. 11.

A shooting victim was taken to the hospital and a suspect was in custody Sunday evening after a fight in the AT&T Stadium parking lot, Arlington police said.

The fight was reported to police about 8:20 p.m. in Lot 10 at the stadium, said Arlington police spokesman Lt. Chris Cook. He said officers heard one gunshot, and a male victim in his early 40s was flown to an area hospital with serious injuries.

Witness Lester Peters of Lufkin said the suspect first held a gun to his head. “I didn’t think he was going to pull the trigger,” he said.

Greg Miller of Diboll, Texas, witnessed the fight and shooting that broke out following the Dallas Cowboys, New England Patriots game Sunday and he describes the harrowing scene outside AT&T Stadium in Arlington.

The suspect, who was injured when he tripped over a retaining wall, also was taken to a hospital.

Further details were not available, Cook said.

By 9:46 p.m. three police cars and an ambulance were still on the scene and officers continued to investigate.

Witnesses said the incident started shortly before 8 p.m., after the Dallas Cowboys’ loss to the New England Patriots. The Cowboys game ended around 6:30 p.m. Fans are allowed to tailgate in AT&T Stadium lots for up to two hours after the game, according to stadium policy.

The policy also says that all vehicles “within the stadium's secured parking perimeter are subject to a security inspection before being allowed to park.” Cowboys spokesman Joe Trahan said that doesn’t mean every vehicle is searched.

Trahan was unsure if the suspect’s vehicle was searched Sunday. Weapons are among the items prohibited from the stadium parking lots. Trahan on Monday morning referred other questions to the Arlington Police Department.

While Cook said he could not recall any other shootings at AT&T Stadium, there have been incidents at other sports venues in North Texas.

On April 13, 2013, a 42-year-old man shot himself in the back of his pickup after arguing with other race fans in the infield campground near the end of the NASCAR Sprint Cup race.

State law prohibits a person from bringing a firearm on the premise where a high school, collegiate or professional sporting event is being conducted. Violation of the law is a Class A misdemeanor punishable by up to a year in jail and a $4,000 fine.

Gates leading into the infield at TMS have visible notice signs that state in English and Spanish: "Texas State Law Provides That It Is Unlawful To Carry A Handgun On These Premises."

On Nov. 4, 2008, an Arlington woman was hit in the arm by a .50 caliber bullet, presumably fired from a nearby shooting range. The bullet pierced the roof of the woman's RV at about 10:30 a.m. and hit her arm, shattering it in four places.

The area around the stadium and Globe Life Park was a massive crowd scene because of the baseball and football games being played.

The Texas Rangers’ game against the Toronto Blue Jays started at 7:05 p.m.

Tailgaters apparently got into a fight after Sunday's Dallas Cowboys-New England Patriots game at AT&T Stadium. This video shows the scene and the suspect being detained.

Star-Telegram writer Rick Press contributed to this report.

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