Growth

Why this California aerospace company is moving its headquarters to Texas

The last Fort Worth F-16

Bobby Tamplin was 26 years old in 1977, when he went to work as a parts fabricator on the F-16 fighter jet. At the time, he was told his job would last “maybe five years.” Forty years later, the 66-year-old recently stood on a windy, cold flight l
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Bobby Tamplin was 26 years old in 1977, when he went to work as a parts fabricator on the F-16 fighter jet. At the time, he was told his job would last “maybe five years.” Forty years later, the 66-year-old recently stood on a windy, cold flight l

A California company that makes parts and assemblies for military aircraft is moving its headquarters to Fort Worth, in the latest example of North Texas raising its profile as an aviation and aerospace hub.

Aeromax Industries Inc. will move into a 12,000-square-foot facility in Aledo Industrial Park in September, company officials said.

Part of what the company does is make parts and assemblies for airplanes and helicopters that are either out of production or in a mature stage of production. Those aircraft include Lockheed Martin’s F-16, Northrop’s F-5 and T-38 and General Electric’s J-85 jet engine.

“After looking at a few other locations, Fort Worth made perfect sense for us,” Tom Brizes, chairman and president of Aeromax, said in an email. “It’s an aerospace-friendly community with many local companies that we’ve been doing business with for years. With no state income tax and reasonable fuel and property prices, we look forward to moving and growing our operation here.”

The Aledo Industrial Park is in Tarrant County, near Interstate 20 and Markum Ranch Rd.

The company’s Fort Worth operations will include management, shipping and receiving, engineering, marketing and administrative, Fort Worth Chamber of Commerce officials said.

“When the Chamber received a call from Aeromax, we knew we could find a home for them that is close to their industry peers and provides a trained aerospace workforce for future growth,” Chris Strayer, chamber senior vice president, said in an email.

Aeromax has a library of over 100,000 blueprints, standards, loft contours and specifications for the manufacture and engineering of parts for legacy aircrafts well after they have been retired, according to chamber officials.

Initially, the company will have about five employees at the Fort Worth headquarters, with plans to expand in the future.

Aeromax recently bought K&S Enterprises, another California company that makes elastomer products for helicopters, and will be moving that company in a year or so, Brizes said. That move could generate another 40-50 jobs, he said.

Gordon Dickson joined the Fort Worth Star-Telegram in 1997. He is passionate about hard news reporting, and his beats include transportation, growth, urban planning, aviation, real estate, jobs, business trends. He is originally from El Paso, and loves food, soccer and long drives.


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