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Police find no evidence of suicide in fatal McClendon auto accident

Oklahoma City police say they found no evidence that the death of former Chesapeake Energy CEO Aubrey McClendon in a vehicle crash a day after he was indicted by a federal grand jury was anything other than an accident.
Oklahoma City police say they found no evidence that the death of former Chesapeake Energy CEO Aubrey McClendon in a vehicle crash a day after he was indicted by a federal grand jury was anything other than an accident. AP

Oklahoma City police say the death of businessman Aubrey McClendon in a vehicle crash appears to have been an accident.

Capt. Paco Balderrama told reporters Tuesday that police have found nothing to indicate the fiery crash that killed McClendon on March 2 was anything but an accident.

Police previously said McClendon, 56, was driving 78 mph when his sport utility vehicle hit a bridge support and burst into flames and that there was no evidence suggesting he tried to avoid the crash.

His death came a day after a federal grand jury indicted him on a bid-rigging charge. He had vowed to fight the charge.

Spokeswoman Amy Elliott for the state medical examiner said a determination on McClendon's manner of death is could be finished by the end of this week.

The former chairman and CEO of Chesapeake Energy helped lead a leasing and drilling bonanza in the Barnett Shale a decade ago and then across the country. Under his leaderhsip, Chesapeake cast a big shadow in North Texas, giving millions to charities, supporting events such as the annual Parade of Lights Christmas parade in Fort Worth and buying the former Pier 1 tower, only to sell it later.

But fortunes turned after natural gas prices collapsed and McClendon was forced out of Chesapeake in 2014 after investors revolted over conflicts between the company and his personal finances.

This article includes material from Star-Telegram archives.

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