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Where’s the best Key lime pie in Fort Worth? Maybe it’s at a Dive

‘Why Pie?’ serves up a heaping slice of Fort Worth flavor

The short film, which was honored at this year's Lone Star Film Festival, features the Paris Coffee Shop and its legendary pies.
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The short film, which was honored at this year's Lone Star Film Festival, features the Paris Coffee Shop and its legendary pies.

Where’s the best Key lime pie in Fort Worth?

That question’s getting tougher.

The return of The Dive Burger Bar, 3520 Alta Mere Drive, and its superized Key lime pie (with a thick but soft crushed-graham crust) reopens the question of exactly which restaurant serves the best example of the chilled summer treat.

The Dive’s Key lime is one of few leftovers from the original work of founding chef Josh Rangel. (He’s now at Funky Picnic Brewery & Cafe, new at 401 Bryan Ave,)

For years, I’d have said Lucile’s, 4700 Camp Bowie Blvd., was best with its crushed-Oreo crust.

But lately, the very limey pie at The Tavern, 2755 S. Hulen St., has pushed to the front. Corporate cousin Cork & Pig, 2869 Crockett St., has served a similar version.

Many readers side with the Oklahoma-based Charleston’s, 3020 S. Hulen St., and Redrock Canyon Grill, 2221 E. Southlake Blvd., which serves a giant quarter-slice of Key Lime in the two similar restaurants.

Those are all spectacular slices, taller or larger than the typical pie.

The Tennessee-based Buttermilk Sky Pie Shops will bring their own version when they open in Ridglea Village. Arlington, Colleyville and Mansfield each already have Buttermilk Sky locations.

JudyPie in Grapevine, 520 S. Main St., also has a notable Key lime.

By the way, the first recorded newspaper references to Key lime pie are in 1932 in a Miami newspaper reader’s recipe for “lime chiffon” pie. It was not widely available in Texas until the 1950s.



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Columnist Bud Kennedy is a Fort Worth guy who covered high school football at 16 and has moved on to two Super Bowls, seven political conventions and 15 Texas Legislature sessions. Since 1985, he has also written more than 2,000 “Eats Beat” columns about Texas dining, restaurants and food.
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