Eats Beat

Is Fort Worth filling up on pies, tacos and barbecue? Readers worry; ‘Hey, Bud!’ says no way

‘Why Pie?’ serves up a heaping slice of Fort Worth flavor

The short film, which was honored at this year's Lone Star Film Festival, features the Paris Coffee Shop and its legendary pies.
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The short film, which was honored at this year's Lone Star Film Festival, features the Paris Coffee Shop and its legendary pies.

Hey, Bud! I love Buttermilk Sky Pie Shop. But are we getting close to saturation in Tarrant County?

—Fretful reader on Facebook

Saturation? Of pies? Never heard of such a thing. The newest Buttermilk Sky Pie location coming in Ridglea Village near Campisi’s is Fort Worth’s first, although the Tennessee-based Southern pie shops are already open in Arlington, Colleyville and Mansfield. Try the buttermilk, chocolate cream or chocolate-coconut-pecan pie, here called “I-40 pie” instead of millionaire pie.

Hey, Bud! I feel like we’re getting too many taco and barbecue joints. Is it going to start hurting?

—Another fretful reader on Facebook

Hasn’t hurt yet, unless you count the pain of trying to finish a double burger and a burnt-ends plate at Heim or a combo plate at the new Flores Barbecue truck at the Trailhead at Clearfork. Cupcake and doughnut shops are more of a passing fad, but tacos and barbecue are Fort Worth staples. (The question is which older restaurants will upgrade to keep pace.)

Hey, Bud! Is the Antone’s Po’Boys that has been on Harry Hines Boulevard in Dallas for years related to the Antone’s in Houston? Just wondered—

—Randy, Dallas

Antone’s Famous Po’Boys from Houston are going statewide again. But there is also an Antone’s in Dallas founded in the 1960s by the same Jalal Antone of Houston, and it serves the same po-boys with signature chow chow. The Dallas shop, 4234 Harry Hines Blvd., is now separate and technically named Antoine’s.



Columnist Bud Kennedy is a Fort Worth guy who covered high school football at 16 and has moved on to two Super Bowls, seven political conventions and 15 Texas Legislature sessions. Since 1985, he has also written more than 2,000 “Eats Beat” columns about Texas dining, restaurants and food.
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