Arts & Culture

Amon Carter Museum closing for the summer, will reopen with five new exhibits

Amon Carter Museum Program for Blind

The Amon Carter Museum offers a program for the visually impaired.
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The Amon Carter Museum offers a program for the visually impaired.

On June 3, The Amon Carter Museum of American Art will close its doors for three months to complete renovations.

“All the gallery spaces will have been enhanced with new sightlines, moveable walls for highly configurable layouts, state-of-the-art lighting and hardwood flooring through the upstairs galleries,” according to a press release.

Designed by Philip Johnson and opened in 1961, the updates also include new galleries to showcase the permanent collection, as well as changes to the main entrance and plaza.

In the fall, Amon Carter will reopen with five new exhibits on September 14.

Mostly notably, Gordon Parks: The New Tide, Early Work 1940-1950 is a traveling exhibit of 150 photographs chronicling the photographer’s early photojournalism, which often addressed issues of civil rights and poverty.

Set in Motion: Camille Utterback and Art That Moves is an interactive installation that uses software to reinterpret visitors’ movements into brushstrokes in a live digital painting.

Puento Nuevo by Justin Favela is a site-specific installation from the Las Vegas artist known for sculptures made with piñata techniques.

From the permanent collection, Seeing in Detail: Scott and Stuart Gentling’s Birds of Texas features 23 watercolor paintings of Texas birds by Fort Worth artists.

One of Texas’ greatest sculptors, James Surls, makes flowers out of steel and pine for a large-scale work, Seven and Seven Flower.

“Through our new installation – which aims to be elegant, dynamic and thought-provoking – the collection will sing in ways it never has before,” Brett Abbott, Director of Collections and Exhibitions, said in the press release. “The museum is poised to inspire more people more deeply in the years ahead, and I look forward to sharing the new galleries with our community.”

For more info, visit cartermuseum.org.

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