The Big Mac Blog

Judge Jason administers Texas Justice on Whitehead

Dallas Cowboys wide receivers Lucky Whitehead (L) and Dez Bryant each have had their share of off-the-field moments while with the team. On Monday, the Cowboys cut Whitehead because of his.
Dallas Cowboys wide receivers Lucky Whitehead (L) and Dez Bryant each have had their share of off-the-field moments while with the team. On Monday, the Cowboys cut Whitehead because of his. jchristopher@star-telegram.com

Back from vacation, just in time to watch the Dallas Cowboys roll out their new company policy on off-the-field behavior, which now includes a new strict no-tolerance edict on mistaken identity.

And, since we are on the subject of God and His miracles, how the Cowboys operate and win football games and make money remains His greatest victory.

On Monday, the Dallas Cowboys cut receiver/returner Lucky Whitehead because he had been allegedly involved in a petty theft charge back in June and failed to appear in court.

Here is the reason they cut him: In two NFL seasons, Whitehead had nine receptions, no touchdowns and four fumbles. He’s an average player who will be easily replaced by a rookie white dude from North Carolina, Ryan Switzer.

As a rule of thumb in sports, it’s never good to be replaced by the little white dude. Unless you’re a kicker.

Turns out his was a case of mistaken identity, and the Virginia cops dropped the charges because, in this instance, Lucky did nothing wrong. Nonetheless, that did not stop our Judge Jason from administering his own brand of Texas Justice and cutting the receiver; Cowboys coach Jason Garrett needed to make an example to the other guys on his football team whose priority it is to be a good football player and win football games in the National Football League.

Guys who know not to be a distraction. Guys who understand it’s about The Star. Guys who understand that it’s about the name on the front of the jersey, and not the back.

Guys like David Irving. Guys like Nolan Carroll. Guys like Damien Wilson. Guys like Ezekiel Elliott.

They get it.

We in the media have put Garrett back in the dunk tank and treated him like a pinata for this latest embarrassment of behavioral policy that is long on rhetoric and laughably short on enforcement.

This is a coach, and a team, that had Greg Hardy and Rolando McClain on the same front seven at the same time. This is a coach, and a team, that has dealt with considerable headaches from Dez Bryant, but define it as a “maturing process.”

What the Cowboys did was to send a message to their average players: If you’re average, don’t give us a reason to cut you. Or, if you’re average, play a position on our team where we lack real talent.

This is why Ezekiel Elliott can have a handful of mysterious assault charges and still have a job with the team. He led the NFL in rushing last season.

This is why Nolan Carroll can have a DUI and still have a job with the team. He’s a cornerback, of which the team has few.

This is why David Irving can fail a PED test, be suspended the first four games of the regular season, and still have a job. He’s a defensive end on a team that can’t sack quarterbacks.

This is why Damien Wilson can have an aggravated assault charge and still have a job with the team. He’s a linebacker on a unit where Jaylon Smith is their second-best player, even though he has a bad knee and never played an NFL down.

Dropping Whitehead sends no message other than the one we already know: Average guys are cut, and Garrett’s rhetoric about character is worthless.

Mac Engel: @macengelprof

  Comments