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Riding plenty of confidence, Poolville man advances to NCHA final round on 3 horses

Matt Miller, competing at the NCHA Futurity in December 2013, advanced to the final round on three horses at the Metallic Cat National Cutting Horse Association Summer Spectacular’s 5- and 6-year-old open division.
Matt Miller, competing at the NCHA Futurity in December 2013, advanced to the final round on three horses at the Metallic Cat National Cutting Horse Association Summer Spectacular’s 5- and 6-year-old open division. Star-Telegram archives

In the mind of Matt Miller, a key to success in the cutting horse business is confidence.

“The horse has to be just as confident as you are when you go down there,” he said. “That’s a big thing in being able to show in these tough classes.”

Miller knows of what he speaks. The Poolville rider/trainer advanced to the final round on three horses at the Metallic Cat National Cutting Horse Association Summer Spectacular. He made the cut in the 5- and 6-year-old open division (horses who are second- and third-year competitors) at Will Rogers Memorial Coliseum.

Miller secured the three final-round berths after competing in the 5- and 6-year-old second round on Tuesday. The final is scheduled for Saturday night. A field of 26 horses with a two-ride score of at least 436.5 advanced to the championship round.

Miller advanced with a two-ride score of 439 on Metallic Smart Cat. He also advanced with a 439 on Mistresssis. He also made the cut with a 437 aboard Metallic Mistress.

All three horses were sired by Metallic Cat, a stallion who won the NCHA Futurity in 2008 with rider Beau Galyean. Metallic Cat is owned by Fort Worth businessman Bobby Patton.

Miller said he and his horses exude confidence.

“Confidence to me is just knowing I’ve done my job, training the horse and preparing him,” Miller said. “Even if I don’t have the perfect work that day or the cows aren’t perfect, confidence enables you to still go show your horse and be successful.”

After tying for first in the first round with a 224, James Payne and PG Heavily Armed advanced to the finals with a 440 after turning in a solid 216 in the second round.

“He’s always been a real physical horse,” Payne said of PG Heavily armed. “The older he’s gotten, the smarter he’s gotten.”

A clutch run

When the tie-down roping title was at stake at the Calgary Stampede, Tuf Cooper, pro rodeo’s defending world all-around champion, was the last competitor to compete in the four-man final on Sunday afternoon at the renowned rodeo in Calgary Alberta.

Caleb Smidt, the 2015 world tie-down roping champion, had taken the lead during the final with a time of 7.1 seconds.

“I knew I had to give it my all, but slow down and be smooth,” Cooper said.

Cooper, who has residences in Decatur and Weatherford, clinched the title with a blistering time of 6.8 seconds. He earned $113,500 ($86,306 in USD) throughout the rodeo.

Brazile roping tough

Trevor Brazile of Decatur, a 23-time world champion, clinched the all-around title at the Sheridan WYO Rodeo, a standout Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association show last weekend in Sheridan, Wyoming. Brazile earned $12,648 in tie-down roping, team roping and steer roping.

Brazile is ranked second in the PRCA’s 2018 world all-around title race with $108,229. Tuf Cooper is ranked No. 1 with $131,777.

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