Dallas Cowboys

Jerry Jones eager to defend himself under oath before Roger Goodell

Look back at the Dallas Cowboys' 2017 season in 90 seconds

Cowboys fans' expectations were high after last year's 13-3 regular-season effort. But Dak Prescott's rising star seemed to fade and Ezekiel Elliott's six-game suspension limited his playing time, keeping the Cowboys from getting to the postseason
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Cowboys fans' expectations were high after last year's 13-3 regular-season effort. But Dak Prescott's rising star seemed to fade and Ezekiel Elliott's six-game suspension limited his playing time, keeping the Cowboys from getting to the postseason

Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones is glad to have his day in court to tell his side of things under oath in his own defense before NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell.

Jones said Friday at the NFL Scouting Combine that he is looking forward to testifying at a hearing Monday in Palm Beach, Fla., before Goodell and other owners in contesting paying reimbursement fees to the NFL.

The league is seeking more than $2 million in legal fees stemming from the federal court case with Cowboys running back Ezekiel Elliott, who fought a six-game suspension under the personal conduct policy and Jones' opposition to Goodell's contract extension.

There is no timetable for when Goodell will make a ruling.

Jones declined further comment.

But it's clear that Jones doesn't plan to go down without a fight against the NFL's decision, which citing a rule that has been on the books since 1977 says an owner must reimburse the league legal fees if he brings litigation against other owners.

For Jones, it's not about the money, but about the principle of things.

He threatened to sue the league to block Goodell's contract extension. He never filed suit.

And regarding Elliott's case, Jones and the Cowboys provided a letter of support. They were not involved in the case.

Per sources, Elliott's lawyers have been asked to come to the hearing on Monday where they will provide documents showing that Jones provided no financial assistance to the case.

Another point Jones expects to use in his defense is that New England Patriots owner Robert Kraft was not asked to reimburse legal fees to the NFL in regards to the Deflategate case even though the Patriots filed an amicus brief in support of quarterback Tom Brady's appeal.

Cowboys fans' expectations were high after last year's 13-3 regular-season effort. But Dak Prescott's rising star seemed to fade and Ezekiel Elliott's six-game suspension limited his playing time, keeping the Cowboys from getting to the postseason





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