Dallas Cowboys

Jerry Jones comments spark NAACP protest before Cowboys-Eagles game

Large group kneels outside Cowboys game calling for criminal justice reform

Pastor Frederick Douglass Haynes of Friendship-West Baptist Church in Dallas led a group of about 300 who knelt during the anthem outside AT&T Stadium Sunday night.
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Pastor Frederick Douglass Haynes of Friendship-West Baptist Church in Dallas led a group of about 300 who knelt during the anthem outside AT&T Stadium Sunday night.

Ahead of the Dallas Cowboys' nationally-televised Sunday night football match-up against the Philadelphia Eagles, the Arlington chapter of NAACP hopes to use the media attention to continue former San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick's fight to protest police brutality.

The Coalition for Justice and about 1,500 protesters were planning to gather in front of the Tom Landry statue outside of AT&T Stadium around 6:30 p.m., railing against Cowboys owner Jerry Jones.





The coalition said the protest is in support of NFL players' First Amendment right to peacefully protest and exercise their rights.

They feel that Jones has hindered the players' right to protest police brutality. They reject the supposition by Jones that the players' actions could be viewed as unpatriotic acts.

The protest comes as Jones is already under fire for a video surfacing from 2013 for alleged inappropriate comments in congratulating a white man on his engagement to his black fiancee.

In the video that was given to gossip website theblast.com, a man asks Jones to give a congratulatory message to his new fiancee as Jones is walking out of a bar.

Jones looks into the camera and says, “Jennifer, congratulations on the wedding. Now, you know he’s with a black girl tonight, don’t you?”

Jones then begins to laugh in the video.

He has also been in a public feud with the NFL over a proposed extension for Commissioner Roger Goodell.

The coalition said that aside from their opinions about Jones' 2013 comments and his handling of players protesting during the national anthem, they still stand with Kaepernick's original intent behind taking a knee.

"We must keep the narrative around the knee is a protest for justice and not a sign of disrespect. The reason Kaepernick knelt has been hijacked. We reaffirm and stand with Colin Kaepernick’s initial stand for justice in response to the ongoing subjugation to police brutality in Black and Brown communities and the continuing state-sanctioned murders of unarmed Black children, women, and men whose murderers have not been held accountable," the Coaltion for Justice said in a news release.

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