Texas A&M Aggies

The UT Longhorns are no longer the cash cow of college sports. But the Aggies are

Largely empty gyms house high-dollar college athletic programs

At UTA's College Park Center you can sit just about anywhere you want to for a Mavericks home basketball game.
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At UTA's College Park Center you can sit just about anywhere you want to for a Mavericks home basketball game.

Texas and Texas A&M are rich.

Particularly when it comes to sports.

In fact, the two schools rank first and second, respectively, in Forbes’ 2018 ranking of the most valuable athletics programs in college sports.

Per the report, the Aggies’ average revenue over the course of the last three seasons amounts to $148 million. Over that same time period, the program turned an average per-year profit of $107 million.

Within that same time period, those two figures for the Longhorns came in at $133 and $87 million, respectively.

Michigan, Alabama and Ohio State rounded out the remaining the spots in the top-five.

The only other Texas program to make it into the top 25 was Texas Tech.

Last December, Texas A&M signed Jimbo Fisher away from Florida State with 10-year, $75 million deal. The school is also paying Texas A&M is paying Kevin Sumlin $10.4 million, the amount that remained on his guaranteed contract when he was fired on Nov. 26.

Texas A&M opened a renovated Kyle Field in 2015 after a $485 million overhaul.

According to the report, Texas ranks in the top-five in contributions, ticket sales, endowments and concessions. The football program also earned $31 million from licensing, royalties and advertising deals.

Forbes had not created this list since 2015. That year and this six prior, the Longhorns ranked first.

Instead of just cheering for his Longhorns, Texas journalism student Ariea Bastami raps about them. Watch his latest Longhorn-themed rap about head coach Shaka Smart, Mo Bamba, Andrew Jones and other key members of the burnt orange basketball team

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