Bud Kennedy

Hood County clerk needs a lesson on freedom

Dueling same-sex marriage rallies in Hood County

Protesters defending their 'religious freedom' faced off against same-sex marriage advocates Thursday in Granbury, where the Hood County clerk had initially refused to issue a marriage license to a gay couple based on her religious objections. (St
Up Next
Protesters defending their 'religious freedom' faced off against same-sex marriage advocates Thursday in Granbury, where the Hood County clerk had initially refused to issue a marriage license to a gay couple based on her religious objections. (St

Always proud of its cowboy legacy, Granbury now must live up to the Code of the West.

The “cowboy way” includes both hospitality and respecting others’ privacy — particularly in matters of relationships and faith.

Nobody ever asked who a cowhand was “seeing,” or if that might be a sin.

That proud cowboy tradition of liberty and privacy remains alive in Texas today, and that helps explain some low-key responses to the Supreme Court ruling that couples of any gender have the same legal right to marry.

Take Palo Pinto County Clerk Janette Green. In that county west of Mineral Wells, she told the Index she’d license any couple.

I took an oath of office to follow the law,” she said, without subjecting that to “my own personal values.”

On the other hand, take Hood County Clerk Katie Lang, who first claimed a religious objection for her whole office and refused, then said it would take three weeks to update forms or software.

According to the Hood County News, Lang ordered patrons and reporters to leave the public area of the taxpayer-funded clerk’s office Thursday when two Hood County men peacefully tried to apply for a license. One of Lang’s staffers tried to collect business cards and names.

If you expected the hometown paper to side with the clerk, a Tea Party newcomer who upset incumbent Mary Burnett in 2014 — well, surprise.

The current editorial is headlined: “Lang blaming all except herself — County clerk’s handling of same-sex marriage an embarrassment.”

“Our county clerk was all over the news,” the editors wrote, “and not in a good way.”

The editorial said she “completely bungled” both the licenses and her disingenuous explanation that reporters “misreported and misconstrued” her comments.

I have a copy of Lang’s email telling her staff, “I am instilling my religious liberty in this office.”

That is not easily misconstrued.

Lang and her backers are taking the curious position that imposing her personal faith on everyone else in her office, her patrons and Hood County’s taxpayers is somehow her own “religious freedom.”

That is not what I call freedom.

It’s definitely not the way of the West.

Bud Kennedy's column appears Sundays, Wednesdays and Fridays. 817-390-7538

Twitter: @BudKennedy

Related stories from Fort Worth Star Telegram

  Comments