Bud Kennedy

A Texas candidate calls for a ‘Texit’ secession, biblical law, executions — but no wall

Irving Republican Larry Kilgore in 2006, left, and at a recent anti-abortion rally in Austin.
Irving Republican Larry Kilgore in 2006, left, and at a recent anti-abortion rally in Austin. Handout photos

Texas’ favorite secessionist is running for governor again, which raises a touchy question.

If Larry SECEDE Kilgore gets elected, does that mean President Trump has to build a wall at the Red River?

“I don’t know why anyone wants to build a wall anywhere,” the Irving Republican said Tuesday, launching his third campaign to lead Texas out of the U.S. and into an independent republic under “biblical law.”

“The Rio Grande is beautiful. The Red River is beautiful. I don’t think we need a wall.”

Kilgore, 52, is well-known to Texas voters. In 2012, he changed his legal middle name to SECEDE.

He still believes in executing adulterers and LGBT Texans and anyone else out of step with his decidedly Old Testament view of society.

But that’s not his primary point in this campaign. SECEDE Kilgore version 3.0 calls for a new, independent Republic of Texas that will punish abortion as felony murder, close public schools and do away with Social Security.

If there are Christians out there who love the Lord, who hate the murder of the unborn, who hate socialism, then let’s build a nation and have freedom.

Irving Republican gubernatorial candidate Larry SECEDE Kilgore

He said he hopes secession can be a “peaceful parting.”

Most places, candidates like Kilgore get laughed out of the room.

Not in Texas. In the 2008 Republican primary, he got 226,649 votes.

By 2014, with secession fervor fading, he finished last in the Republican primary behind eventual Gov. Greg Abbott with fewer than 20,000 votes.

“I tried to build a coalition of libertarians and Democrats for secession,” he said.

“Well, that failed miserably. So this time, I’m just sticking with my roots.”

In 2010, Larry SECEDE Kilgore rushed into a Tea Party rally and knocked over the U.S. flags. He called attendees “idol worshipers.”

That means running primarily to outlaw abortion. Kilgore joined a protest in Austin Feb. 25 supporting Arlington state Rep. Tony Tinderholt’s bill to make abortion a criminal felony and resist any U.S. federal court enforcement.

“I like Tinderholt,” Kilgore said, naming his favorites in the Texas House: “I like [Bedford Republican] Jonathan Stickland. I like [Irving Republican] Matt Rinaldi. There’s some good guys in there trying to abolish abortion.

“I’m just saying if there are Christians out there who love the Lord, who hate the murder of the unborn, who hate socialism, then let’s build a nation and have freedom.”

He claims support from prominent abortion protester Flip Benham, online talk radio host Doc Greene Sr. and several anti-abortion or secession leaders.

According to his latest campaign finance report, Kilgore has $910 in the campaign bank.

He also has a decidedly different look this election. He hasn’t shaved or cut his hair since his 2014 primary loss.

“I don’t plan on cutting my hair or beard until Texas has laws that can protect unborn children,” he said.

Don’t count on this campaign turning out any different.

Texas Republicans just helped elect a president. They’re in no rush to leave the country.

Bud Kennedy: 817-390-7538, @BudKennedy. His column appears Sundays, Wednesdays and Fridays.

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