Letters to the Editor

Letters: End daylight-saving; don’t complain; shame on FSU

End daylight-saving

I’ve never heard of state Rep. Dan Flynn nor am I sure where Van, Texas, might be, but I was glad to read that he has filed House Bill 150 to abolish daylight-saving time.

Some of the proposals our state lawmakers will review are extremely important and some, well, not so much.

While the daylight-saving issue probably falls in the latter category, it’s one that has never made much sense and just confuses folks.

Whether it benefits farmers, energy savings, schoolchildren, health concerns or saving fuel for World War I, it has been fraught with controversy.

Why must we change our clocks twice a year? We don’t need summer days lasting until 9 p.m. (8 p.m. will do just fine, thank you) and the radical change in night’s arrival time each November is just maddening.

Let’s join Arizona and Hawaii, opt out and stop this silly manipulation of Mother Time.

— Patrick Jenkins, Arlington

Don’t complain

Regarding the recent letter from Burt Ballentine bemoaning the many hours he has to work not flying to accrue his flight pay:

Ask any Army, Air Force, Marine or Navy pilot serving in the Middle East if they would trade places with him.

Give me a break.

— Jeff Murray, Weatherford

Shame on FSU

Regarding the article, “Winston’s FSU hearing pushed back to Dec. 1” (Nov. 13):

A former student made allegations to authorities about sexual abuse in 2012. Since that incident, there has been another accusation.

What has been done? Nothing!

His Nov. 17 hearing was pushed back to Dec. 1.

Is it possible justice will be pushed back again, until the bowl games have been completed?

It would appear that those with the judicial power, as well as the university, are waiting for the football season to end.

This is certainly a joke and a sad representation of our justice system and FSU’s code violation committee.

— Jim Sanderson, Fort Worth

Promote from within

Before retirement, I was vice president of employee and labor relations of a successful Fortune 500 corporation which worked very hard to develop personnel and promote from within.

Can you not visualize what an inspiring boost that gives to employees down in the ranks knowing that if they work hard and excel, they have an opportunity to move up in the organization?

Boards now seem to feel that they have to go nationwide and hire someone who may be overrated, who may know nothing about the new company, who will have to spend valuable time learning about the company, will probably be overpaid — and to whom the business may have to pay an enormous sum to get rid of when he/she fails. .

Why not look within and give someone a chance who already knows the organization and the job?

It has been said: “Everyone deserves the right to be given a chance to fail.” I hasten to add: “Or succeed.”

— Jack P. Jones, Fort Worth

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