Letters to the Editor

Can the U.S. rein in Russia, or is another Cold War on the horizon?

The situation in eastern Ukraine is extreme. Just days after President Obama announced additional economic sanctions on Russia, a Malaysia Airlines plane carrying nearly 300 people was apparently shot out of the sky. Disputes over who is responsible will likely continue, even after the results of an investigation into the crash are finalized. Assuming Russia is in some way responsible — either directly or by supporting separatists — what more can the U.S. and Europe do to rein in Russia? Are we in for another Cold War, or is it time to take more targeted action?

Now is the most opportune moment in time to “rebuild” the old Soviet Union.

Putin will not waste a minute.

As a Cold War vet who spent two years on the Russian border, I can assure you this will be done by the 2016 election.

— Don Pittman, Arlington

The downed Malaysia jetliner was a tragedy, but we need to be careful about the herd mentality that’s driven by condemnation of the Russians.

There’s no definitive evidence that they are culpable in downing the civilian aircraft. The rope-’em, throw-’em and brand-’em philosophy is not the way to rein in Russia.

Diplomacy works well with the right arbiter. We need action that serves our best interest here and abroad.

Let the airliner investigation begin without prejudice; just the hard facts.

— Delbert Cantrell, Fort Worth

I was raised to believe that if you live in a glass house, then it’s not a good idea to throw stones at your neighbor.

It’s apparent that the Obama administration was never taught that.

We have been so quick to show that Russia supported rebels who tragically, and mistakenly, brought down the Malaysian jet last week. Why, it’s almost as if Putin pulled the trigger!

However, we are slow to point out that all of the countries that we have “freed” in order to make democratic societies have all rejoiced in the same freedom, persecuting or killing Christians!

Egypt, Libya, Iraq and the “rebels” we are arming in Syria are all killing Christians with American government-supplied munitions!

Keep in mind that the Russian-supported rebels did not mean to shoot down a passenger jet; however, our Muslim “friends’ ” slaughter of innocent Christians is most definitely intentional.

— Larry Hathaway, Grand Prairie

If the Russians are culpable for supplying armaments and instructing the pro-Russian separatists on the use of the devices, are they culpable in the deaths of innocent men, women and children on flight MH17?

If the U.S. arms and trains the Israeli forces in the weapons it supplies to the Jewish state, are we culpable in the deaths of the innocent men, women and children of Palestine?

— Jim Sanderson,

Fort Worth

The tragic events surrounding the destruction of Malaysian Flight 17 over eastern Ukraine must be condemned with sanctions and penalties imposed against Russia for their involvement in the supply of the SA-11 anti-aircraft missile to the Ukrainian separatists.

However, I have difficulty in separating the actions of President Putin and Russia’s involvement from that of the U.S. and its continued policies of supplying weapon systems and training to governments around the world.

In fact, the U.S. was the No. 1 arms-exporting country worldwide in the five-year period through 2013.

Bottom line, neither the separatists nor Putin will ever admit their guilt and, as such, not much will happen.

— Patrick Jenkins,

Arlington

First: Return our missiles to Poland and the Czech Republic.

Second: Strengthen our military to the point that the bad guys will respect us.

Third: No more apologies and attempts to play nice from our inexperienced leader to those who would destroy our nation.

After all, we have done more humanitarian work, good will and foreign aid than any other nation.

We cannot be weak. Let’s return to the strong power we once were and the world respected us.

— Eva Snapka,

Arlington

Yes, we are in for another Cold War.

Unfortunately cold wars are won and controlled by the strongest leader.

Russia has a very strong leader in Putin and we have a very weak leader in Obama.

Obama has continually drawn “red lines” and backed down from them.

He has alienated our allies by refusing to support Israel and, in fact, supporting Hamas as they try to destroy Israel.

He has alienated Germany by spying on their leaders.

He has continued to show weak leadership and is allowing Iran to come ever so close to having a nuclear weapon.

We need firm, decisive leadership, and I do not know from where this is going to come.

There is no action that we can take until the leadership void is filled.

— Walter H. Delashmit,

Justin

  Comments