Letters to the Editor

Bad behavior goes both ways; Mall shooting shows need for training; Police can’t afford to wait on gunman; Birdville students not forced to pray; Middle class may get burned by tax cut.

The Arlington Police Department released two photographs depicting the male suspect involved in the police officer-involved shooting at the Parks Mall.
The Arlington Police Department released two photographs depicting the male suspect involved in the police officer-involved shooting at the Parks Mall. Courtesy

Bad behavior goes both ways

If Kelly Canon felt Rep. Joe Barton’s text messages were inappropriate — why did she continue the exchange them for a year (2012-2013)? Was she simply getting a kick out of egging him on (reminiscent of Billy Bush and Donald Trump)?

Now she’s issued a complaint (guess she’s needing her “15 minutes of fame”).

This inappropriate behavior swings both ways — I agree that some men are just pigs, but a lot of women are certainly not blameless! I can assure you that this age-old problem will continue long after all the “whistleblowing” has died on the vine!

Patsy R. Abbott, Grapevine

Police can’t afford to wait on gunman

You can ban anything that even remotely looks like a gun, but it’s the person behind it who sets the stage for what happens when it’s pointed at an officer in uniform. (Editorial on fake guns, Nov. 28.)

That is, a criminal with intent to carry and use a real gun can paint a red tip on it to fool an officer to allow the bad guy to fire first. Real, fake or something similar, an officer can’t wait to suffer a critical mistake.

Richard M. Holbrook,

Weatherford

Mall shooting shows need for training

The shooting at the Parks at Arlington mall demonstrates a need for training. Shoplifting is not a capital offense, and bystanders were placed in unnecessary danger.

A couple of pairs of sunglasses should not put taxpayers at risk of civil suit payouts such as the killing of Philando Castile in Minnesota, where a City Council had to pay a wrongful-death settlement of $800,000 (P. 10A, Nov. 30.)

Our businesses and city police protect us with security, but it needs to be smart policing with money spent on training or extra personnel. Poor decision making could cost us millions.

Pat Gentry, Arlington

Birdville students not forced to pray

The basic premise of Isaiah Smith, a 2014 graduate of Birdville High School, was the trustees’ “practice of subjugating its students to prayer at school board meetings.”

This is a fabrication. The Birdville school trustees have opened their meetings with a student statement, which on occasion has been a prayer. The lie is that the students are “subjugated” The student has freedom of choice in regard to the remark.

The Birdville trustees are aware of the First Amendment, which says Congress shall make no laws establishing or preventing the free exercise of religion. The occasional student is offering a prayer, which is allowed under the First Amendment.

The basis of Smith’s lawsuit was a distortion of fact and a weak argument at best. That’s what Judge John McBryde of Fort Worth, the 5th Circuit Court, and the Supreme Court determined when it remanded the suit back to the initial courts. I regret that the Birdville trustees were required to spend constituents’ tax dollars to defend the case.

Bruce K. Jacobson, M.D.,

Fort Worth

Middle class may get burned by tax cut

The tax bill the Senate passed doesn’t help the middle class. It’s a large donation to corporate interests in spite of what Sens. Cornyn and Cruz say. It will be to late to fix when it really begins to affect us.

Suzanne Mabe,

Fort Worth

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