Letters to the Editor

Real costs of immigration; don’t stand for fear of SB 4; Texas tees; sick and tired of firecrackers; more regulation of immigrants?

Cameron County Judge Eddie Trevino, Jr., seated third from left, speaks during a county commissioners meeting on Tuesday, July 11, 2017, in Brownsville, Texas. The South Texas county's governing body voted in favor of joining a lawsuit filed against the State of Texas by the border-town of El Cenizo which claims that the law, which would let police ask people about their immigration status during routine stops violates both Texas and U.S. Constitutions.
Cameron County Judge Eddie Trevino, Jr., seated third from left, speaks during a county commissioners meeting on Tuesday, July 11, 2017, in Brownsville, Texas. The South Texas county's governing body voted in favor of joining a lawsuit filed against the State of Texas by the border-town of El Cenizo which claims that the law, which would let police ask people about their immigration status during routine stops violates both Texas and U.S. Constitutions. AP

Real costs of immigration

Recently, my husband was at a red light when he was rear-ended by a driver with no ID, driver’s license or insurance, and she spoke no English. Her truck hadn’t been registered or inspected in more than 18 months and had paper tags.

My husband is OK. The outcome could have been much worse than the cost of time, money and lost work that it has been.

The presence of immigrants here illegally and the underground economy they support is not benign. There are real costs to law-abiding, taxpaying, lifelong residents of this city.

We must support Senate Bill 4 in Fort Worth.

Regina G. Sanders,

Fort Worth

DON’T stand for fear OF SB 4

Senate Bill 4 (the so-called “Sanctuary Cities” bill) will foster fear, distrust, paranoia and animosity in Fort Worth.

Unconstitutional SB 4 dumps federal responsibilities on the shoulders of police chiefs and sheriffs. But the burden falls on overworked and untrained peace officers whose job should focus on more critical concerns.

Short-sighted citizens incorrectly believe that SB 4 targets only “bad hombres” and mujeres malas specifically from the Latino population.

But it allows a peace officer to stop anyone of any color and demand proof of citizenship.

Fort Worth is the largest Texas city not to stand up against an unconstitutional bill.

We must join our forward-thinking sister cities in suing the state. Let’s show residents and newcomers we have compassion, we honor the Constitution, and we stand behind our spiritual beliefs.

Elva Moser, Benbrook

Texas tees

One very important lesson I’ve learned in my 64.5 years: Don’t grow old without a hobby.

Why on Earth didn’t Colonial Country Club requisition a lumber mill to take away that fallen pecan tree, mill it and give it to a local artisan to fashion it into something beautiful for the clubhouse? Conference table? At least a billion golf tees. No imagination.

Greg S. Pate, Fort Worth

Sick and tired of firecrackers

I live on the East Side, and fireworks started the Friday before July 4 and were still going Sunday.

I’ve talked to the Fort Worth Police Department and Fire Department three times, but nothing has happened.

I thought disturbing the peace and breaking the law usually meant jail time.

Mary Brown, Fort Worth

More regulation of immigrants?

Senate Bill 4 is unconstitutional because it increases regulation of immigrants, which is already covered by federal laws. SB 4 will violate First Amendment rights of elected officials and police since they will be fined or fired if they refuse to enforce it. SB 4 continues the Texas pattern and practice of violating civil rights of minorities through discrimination as well as our Texas Voter ID and redistricting.

SB 4 is under litigation from every major Texas city except Fort Worth. This bill will affect the relationship between the police and our communities. It will allow people to be questioned and asked to “show papers” because of their skin color.

SB 4 is bad for Texas, and Fort Worth must join the litigation against it.

Kathleen C. Hall,

Fort Worth

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