Letters to the Editor

Officer disciplined; school ratings; impending doom

Fort Worth Police Chief Joel Fitzgerald speaks at a press conference Monday to announce the discipline for Officer William Martin, whose arrest of a woman became a viral video on social media.
Fort Worth Police Chief Joel Fitzgerald speaks at a press conference Monday to announce the discipline for Officer William Martin, whose arrest of a woman became a viral video on social media. rmallison@star-telegram.com

Officer disciplined

Fort Worth Police Chief Joel Fitzgerald says Officer William Martin is “contrite... (and) realized his attitude was not proper” during the arrest of Jacqueline Craig and daughters.

Why then has Martin’s attorney asserted to the press that he will appeal Martin’s suspension to seek “justice” for him?

Martin has proved himself unworthy to be an armed police officer, and Fitzgerald has compromised his own integrity in failing to honestly report Martin’s response.

Little wonder police do not command due respect in minority communities.

Henry Frost, Dallas

 

I’ll be the first to admit mistakes were made by the police officer and the police department, but hopefully they will learn from it.

Will the other side learn? What they want is for a man who 95 percent of his time working in their neighborhood is trying to keep their peace and protect them — and stay alive — to be fired?

What do you suppose would have happened when the officer arrived at the scene if everyone would have been courteous and in a normal voice approached the officer with the problem?

Remember, police officers are human beings. They react just like anyone else when tested and yelled at.

Training helps, but human reaction sometimes overshadows training. Sure, they will send him for more training and take several thousand dollars out of his pocket for his mistake, but with the rate that police officers are being killed nowadays, John Q. Public had better get a grip.

What if one day you beg for police to come, and no one does?

Dale Allen, Hurst

School ratings

After 12 years of Army service, I chose to return to my home of Arlington with my husband to raise our children and to reinvest in the community that largely influenced the woman I am today.

Central to that upbringing is that quality education — access, assessment and resulting preparedness — is something we here in Tarrant County value deeply.

Our current Texas school “grading” system rates students and schools based on an assessment that neither higher education nor the workforce consider a valid predictor of post-secondary success.

To compound this, the Legislature introduced a misdirected “A-F report card” that fails to account for factors that are a challenge to achieving strong academic performance.

The impact to students in schools rated “D” or “F” and to the districts is irresponsible, and has the potential to damage communities rather than help them grow and flourish.

Urge your state legislators to introduce/sponsor legislation that affords districts the flexibility to design their own systems of accountability and assessment, allowing them to customize curriculum to better meet the needs of their students.

It’s time for our state to find a solution that will move public education forward for our children and our communities.

Jeannie Deakyne, Arlington

Impending doom

For the past eight years the conservatives thought the country was going to hell, and it didn't.

Now the liberals think the country will go to hell, and it won't.

Bob Cosby, Fort Worth

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