Editorials

Hate that vacant lot? Fort Worth can help

THE EDITORIAL BOARD

Fort Worth is considering an urban agriculture zoning ordinance that, among other things, would allow for large gardens in residential zoning and let gardeners set up stands and sell their produce a couple days a week.
Fort Worth is considering an urban agriculture zoning ordinance that, among other things, would allow for large gardens in residential zoning and let gardeners set up stands and sell their produce a couple days a week. mfaulkner@star-telegram.com

As you drive down the street, you see that lot, the weed-filled eyesore everyone hates but no one knows know how to improve?

City Council has an idea, and it’s a pretty great one.

The city’s proposed urban agriculture amendments would allow community gardens, urban farms, bee colonies and aquaponics on underused or vacant land without the need for rezoning.

That eyesore could finally get that makeover, bring some fresh farming into the area and help wipe out some of Fort Worth’s food deserts.

When a neighborhood has the opportunity to give healthier options for its occupants while beautifying the area, it should take it.

The urban farmers would be allowed to sell produce at the lot (think pop-up stands), helping bring some much-needed green to Fort Worth’s 11 food deserts.

The council will most likely discuss the amendments in August.

If approved, they will make Fort Worth the first Tarrant County city with such amendments.

A few things need to be hammered out, like water usage, but Fort Worth wants its residents to combat food deserts, grow produce and make neighborhoods more appealing.

All good things for the city, much better than an ugly vacant lot.

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