Editorials

Leave tornado chasing to the professionals

THE EDITORIAL BOARD

A storm chaser photographs a rotating thunderstorm just east of Pretty Prairie, Kansas, April 14, 2012.
A storm chaser photographs a rotating thunderstorm just east of Pretty Prairie, Kansas, April 14, 2012. MCT

We’re smack dab in the middle of another tornado season.

But one of the biggest nuisances doesn’t come from the sky.

We’re talking about you, amateur storm chasers.

Storm chasing, a vocation and/or passion for some, has made its way into the national zeitgeist.

We blame you, Twister.

It’s become so popular that tornado chasers even use the term “chaser convergence” when they spot a gaggle of vehicles huddled together along the side of the road.

Storm chasing should be left to the professionals.

Not only do they understand the gravity of being near a giant tornado, but they also know the etiquette of navigating through rural countryside.

Not all tornadoes happen near a convenient parking lot.

Some occur in rural areas where a narrow dirt road is the only thoroughfare.

Some are barely wide enough for two cars to pass, and chasers can clog them as they shoot storm video.

The surrounding land most likely belongs to someone.

That landowner might not take too kindly to people trespassing on the property.

Roadside parking can also be a safety hazard if an evacuation is needed.

Getting that tornado selfie is not worth anyone’s safety.

  Comments