Editorials

Clinton understands Texan Democrats

THE EDITORIAL BOARD

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton reacts to supporters as she arrives at her Super Tuesday election night rally in Miami, Tuesday, March 1, 2016.
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton reacts to supporters as she arrives at her Super Tuesday election night rally in Miami, Tuesday, March 1, 2016. AP

Clinton has most likely put a stop to the Bern.

Hillary Clinton, 68, fueled her way toward the Democratic nomination after sweeping up most of the 11 states on Super Tuesday, including Texas.

In Tarrant County, she picked up about 70 percent of the Democratic votes while Bernie Sanders, 74, only grabbed about 30 percent.

The former secretary of state’s campaign in the South seemed to have better footing with Democrat voters than her Iowa and New Hampshire outings.

She focused on minorities and their issues and built a fortified message dealing with discrimination and education.

Sanders gave a good showing in Texas, especially with millennial voters, but in a state with a heavy minority population, he didn’t really stand a chance.

Though his chances here were slim, his presence and popularity with certain voter groups has made Clinton spend more time addressing issues and less time toting about her resume.

To consider Sanders beaten would be foolhardy, but Clinton can breathe a little easier.

Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton won the most states in Super Tuesday, but the underdog candidates also took home enough smaller prizes to remain in the race and fight another day.

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