Editorials

Study sheds a light on self-induced abortion

The 2013 law is the subject of a legal case to be argued in the current Supreme Court term.
The 2013 law is the subject of a legal case to be argued in the current Supreme Court term. AP

The Texas Policy Evaluation Project at The University of Texas at Austin had a revelation.

A study released by the Texas Policy Evaluation Project gave no specific time frame with its estimate that between 100,000 and 240,000 women aged 18 to 49 in Texas have tried to self-induce abortion. An editorial published Thursday included an incorrect time frame.

Because fewer clinics are available and Misoprostol, the “abortion drug,” is available without a prescription across the border in Mexico, the thinking has been that self-induced abortion would rise.

But the poll results should be taken with a grain of salt. The number was already on the rise before the restrictions, according to the same study.

The moment of revelation came when pollsters asked the respondants whether they would recommend self-induction to a friend. The majority said no.

Even after going through a self-induced abortion, most of the women who answered the poll would advise friends with an unwanted pregnancy to visit a clinic for health and safety reasons.

That’s interesting information.

The 2013 law is the subject of a legal case to be argued in the current Supreme Court term.

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