Weather

Newsflash: It’s hot and only getting hotter

While Sunday and Monday could only be a tick or two off, the National Weather Service in Fort Worth says North Texas could see triple-digits Tuesday.
While Sunday and Monday could only be a tick or two off, the National Weather Service in Fort Worth says North Texas could see triple-digits Tuesday. National Weather Service Fort Worth

As North Texans head out to celebrate Independence Day this weekend, temperatures are inching toward this year’s first 100-degree day.

While Sunday and Monday could only be a tick or two off, the National Weather Service in Fort Worth says North Texas could see triple digits Tuesday.

Meteorologist Juan Hernandez said if it does reach 100, it would likely be between 3 and 6 p.m, the hottest time of the day.

While it won’t actually hit 100 degrees temparaturewise Sunday, high humidity will push heat index values to an expected 104.

So, yes, it’s summer and it’s hot. Here’s a look at 100-degree weather as measured at Dallas/Fort Worth Airport, by the numbers:

  • July 1 average first 100-degree day.
  • July 26 first 100-degree day last year.
  • Sept. 7 last 100-degree day last year.
  • 6 average number of 100-degree days in July.
  • 15 100-degree days last year.
  • 18 average number of 100-degree days annually.
  • 71 most 100-degree days in a year, in 2011.
  • 106 degrees, hottest days of 2015, on Aug. 9-10 (and the highest temperature since 108 on Aug. 9, 2012).

If you’re planning on being outdoors, such as at the pool or lake, make sure to use sunscreen, stay hydrated and find a shady spot every now and then to cool off.

Check out these locations for cooling stations across Dallas-Fort Worth, provided by the Salvation Army.

While it’s certainly hot here, it’s much better than in Death Valley, Calif., where the high is expected to reach 111 on Sunday.

Azia Branson: 817-390-7547, @aziabranson

Be smart and stay cool

How to stay safe when the temperature is rising.

Hydrate: The more you are outside, the more water you should be drinking, especially if you're engaging in a strenuous activity.

Ventilate: If you can avoid going outside for long periods of time, you probably should. Stay in the air conditioning or keep windows open and use fans to stay cool.

Cover up: Wear light-colored and loose-fitting clothing to avoid trapping the sun's heat, and wear a hat to shield yourself from the sun. If you feel yourself getting too hot, remove anything covering your head that can trap heat.

Limit activity: If you must go outside, limit time spent doing strenuous activities. MedStar says heatstroke can occur in less than an hour, so make sure to drink water or sports drinks before, during and after strenuous activities outdoors.

Check on loved ones: Call or visit any elderly friends and relatives to make sure they are staying cool and hydrated. Elderly people can be the most vulnerable to heat-related problems.

Hot cars: Never leave a child or pet in a hot car, even for a short time.

Source: MedStar Mobile Healthcare

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