Your Commute

This Fort Worth-Dallas bike trail now has the money. Where exactly will it be built?

Keith Vick, left, walks along the bike trail near downtown Fort Worth with a bag of trash he collected during the 23rd Annual Trinity River Trash Bash Saturday, September 20, 2014. Groups gathered at nine locations along the Trinity River to pick up trash.  Special/Bob Haynes
Keith Vick, left, walks along the bike trail near downtown Fort Worth with a bag of trash he collected during the 23rd Annual Trinity River Trash Bash Saturday, September 20, 2014. Groups gathered at nine locations along the Trinity River to pick up trash. Special/Bob Haynes Special to the Star-Telegram

It’s official.

A planned Fort Worth to Dallas hike and bike trail got the funding it needs. The Regional Transportation Council this week approved the $40 million, 53-mile trail at its Thursday meeting, all but assuring the project will be open to the public by fall 2023.

Some readers have asked where exactly the trail will be built. The North Central Texas Council of Governments, the parent agency of the RTC and the region’s official planning body, has released an updated map showing the trail route.

The RTC’s contribution, which largely is made up of federal funds, amounts to $36.74 million, including the Fort Worth-Dallas trail and the Cotton Belt Trail from Northeast Tarrant County to Plano.

Several cities including Fort Worth and Arlington have also used millions of dollars of bond funding to build portions of the trail network within their boundaries.

With two new bridges installed in Arlington this week, another gap in series of bike trails between Fort Worth and Dallas has been closed.



The trail will connect Fort Worth’s Trinity Trails and Arlington’s River Legacy Trails to paths in Grand Prairie, Irving and Dallas.

The plan involves connecting existing trails in all the cities, and filling in a few miles of gaps where no trails currently exist. One of those gaps is near Texas 360 in east Fort Worth, near the new American Airlines headquarters.

“I would like to thank the RTC for approving this important bicycle-pedestrian trail segment. The regional trail provides connections to numerous major destinations and employment centers in Fort Worth, including downtown, Panther Island, the emerging Trinity Lakes mixed-use development and more,” Fort Worth Mayor Betsy Price said.

“As an avid cyclist, I also understand the health benefits associated with being active. I appreciate the RTC for providing residents across the region improved access to trails and for recognizing bicycling and walking’s value as a way to connect to jobs, education, transit, mobility and other amenities that make our region great.”

 

This report includes information from the Star-Telegram archives.

Gordon Dickson: 817-390-7796; @gdickson



Dickson: 817-390-7796; @gdickson
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