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Booster Fuels pumps 3 million gallons of gas as it expands in DFW

Booster Fuels, a startup company backed by Ross Perot Jr., Paul Allen and the folks behind Uber, has now pumped 3 million gallons of gasoline for its mobile customers. The company uses a smartphone application to provide an on-site, full-service gas station service for individuals that park in large parking lots (like Alliance-based companies).
Booster Fuels, a startup company backed by Ross Perot Jr., Paul Allen and the folks behind Uber, has now pumped 3 million gallons of gasoline for its mobile customers. The company uses a smartphone application to provide an on-site, full-service gas station service for individuals that park in large parking lots (like Alliance-based companies). Star-Telegram archives

Tired of stopping for gas on the way home from work?

More workers in Dallas-Fort Worth or the San Francisco Bay Area are getting their tanks filled up at work, thanks to Booster Fuels.

The company, which got its start just 18 months ago at AllianceTexas in far north Fort Worth, this week celebrated pumping its 3 millionth gallon of gas. Most of its customers work at one of about 250 corporate campuses in North Texas and Northern California. The company typically enters into agreements with large employers to make the rounds in company parking lots, filling the tanks of employees who sign up for the program.

Customers use smartphone apps to order gas while at work and, at a designated time, a Booster Fuels tanker truck arrives at the workplace and fills tanks while the customers go about their jobs. Global satellite positioning is used to help the Booster Fuels driver find customers’ cars in the lots.

The privately-held company, which boasts investors such as Dallas-Fort Worth businessman Ross Perot Jr. and Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen, plans to expand in other metro areas in the United States. But for now, the company wants to continue gaining market share in North Texas and Northern California, founder and chief executive officer Frank Mycroft said.

“We still have a lot of room to grow in our local markets,” Mycroft told the Star-Telegram in an interview. “But we have lots of regular customers. The average customer refills with us once every nine days. We have customers who haven’t been to a gas station in more than a year.”

Competitive prices

The cost of fuel is usually competitive with area gas stations. For example, on Tuesday, regular unleaded was selling for $2.39 a gallon at a Haltom City RaceTrac, while Booster Fuels customers were getting their tanks filled for $2.19 a gallon.

The company offers regular unleaded or premium unleaded — and the latter usually costs a bit more per gallon, just like at gas stations.

Other places where Booster Fuels makes regular rounds in the Metroplex include Mercedes-Benz Financial Services, Dyncorp International and Galderma Laboratories in north Fort Worth, and the University of Texas at Dallas in Richardson.

Motorists who use Booster Fuels have driven 430,000 fewer miles during the past year and a half, reducing their carbon footprint by 162 tons, according to the company. That’s the equivalent of planting more than 6,700 trees.

Booster Fuels was launched at AllianceTexas, home of Hillwood Properties and many of the fuel company’s best customers.

The company is based in Burlingame, Calif., but also has corporate offices in Dallas and San Jose, Calif.

Booster Fuels drivers also deliver gas to major employers such as Cisco, Oracle, eBay, Gilead Sciences, McKesson and PepsiCo.

Fewer emissions

By allowing the gas to come to them, motorists have reduced their time on the road by about 430,000 miles since Booster Fuels started in the fall of 2015, a company official said.

“We are thrilled with employee interest and use of Booster Fuels since we started offering this perk seven months ago,” Todd Harris, president of Tech CU, said in an email. “Booster gas delivery is one of the highest adopted benefits we’ve ever offered, with 40 percent of employees saving time, money, and hassle with this free service. We’re also happy that Booster contributes to our corporate social responsibility efforts by decreasing the carbon footprint of those using the service.”

Booster Fuels has bright-purple trucks, manufactured on an Isuzu chassis and customized by SkyMark of Kansas City, Mo. The vehicles are modeled after fuel trucks commonly seen carrying jet fuel at airports.

The trucks are much smaller than refueling trucks often seen at gas stations. They are about as long as a Suburu Outback and have a turning radius comparable to a Honda Civic, a company official said, so they can easily maneuver through pretty much any surface parking lot.

The trucks carry 800 gallons of regular unleaded and 400 gallons of premium and can fuel a vehicle in as little as three minutes, Parker said.

This report includes information from the Star-Telegram archives.

Gordon Dickson: 817-390-7796, @gdickson

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