Elections

Voters OK Euless liquor sales, Grapevine building upgrades and Bedford park overhaul

Voters in Euless at the Euless Public Library on Tuesday, November 7, 2017. Euless has a proposal on the ballot to allow liquor stores within city limits. Voters there also weighed in on constitutional amendments.
Voters in Euless at the Euless Public Library on Tuesday, November 7, 2017. Euless has a proposal on the ballot to allow liquor stores within city limits. Voters there also weighed in on constitutional amendments. jlmarshall@star-telegram.com

Local proposals to allow liquor stores in Euless, expand an animal shelter in Grapevine and reallocate sales tax in Lake Worth were among the measures appeared headed toward victory late Tuesday.

But a plan to boost the salaries of police and firefighters in Richland Hills to match salaries in nearby cities failed.

Seven constitutional amendments touching on issues such as 50-50 charitable raffles and allowing tax exemptions for spouses of first responders also appeared headed toward passage.

Here’s a look at how issues on the Tarrant County ballot were faring late Tuesday evening, according to unofficial, incomplete election results.

Local issues

Bedford: A $70 million bond package to improve the Boys Ranch Park, to pay for a new ballfield, aquatic center and multipurpose event facilities held on to a narrow lead, with 51 percent in support and 49 percent opposed, with 12 of 12 precincts reporting.

Benbrook Water Authority: Three people are being chosen for the board of directors. A look at where the votes stood with eight of nine precincts reporting: David Hafer, 31 percent; Dave Clark, 25 percent; Rick Whitehurst, 23 percent; and Dennis G. Lindgron, 21 percent.

Euless: A plan to allow liquor stores in Euless was headed to a strong victory, with 81 percent of voters in support, with 14 of 15 precincts reporting.

Grapevine: A look at the three propositions: Two handily won — a $3.9 million bond package to expand the Grapevine Animal Shelter and Adoption Center drew 81 percent in support and a $16 million bond package to move and reconstruct two fire stations drew 88 percent in favor. The third proposal, a $4.8 million bond package for a multi-use facility and clubhouse at the Grapevine Municipal Golf Course, narrowly passed with 50.17 percent support, with all precincts reporting. Eleven votes separated the measure’s success or failure.

Haltom City: Linda “Lin” Thompson was elected to fill the unexpired Place 3 City Council seat, claiming 63 percent of the vote to Trenton Tidwell’s 37 percent, with all precincts reporting.

Lake Worth: A plan to reallocate the sales tax was approved with 65 percent support, with all precincts tallied.

Richland Hills: A plan to boost the salaries of police officers and firefighters to the average amounts paid in surrounding cities including Hurst, Haltom City, North Richland Hills and Fort Worth was rejected, as 73 percent of voters turned it down, with four of four precincts reporting.

And in the race for the unexpired term of Place 4, Roland Goveas won with 60 percent of the vote to Lisa Lachance-Skier’s 24 percent and Javier Alvarez’s 16 percent, with all precincts reporting.

White Settlement: Mayor Roland A. White won his re-election bid, claiming 54 percent of the vote to 46 percent for Jerry R. Burns, with all precincts reporting. And Gregg Geesa handily won the race to fill the unexpired Place 5 council term, claiming 58 percent of the vote to Dustry Pulliam’s 41 percent, with all precincts reporting.

Constitutional amendments

Here’s a look at how constitutional amendments were faring statewide, according to unofficial and incomplete state election results.

Proposition 1 Partially disabled veterans, or their spouses, could get a partial homestead exemption for homes donated to them if they pay some amount for the home: 86 percent for, 14 percent against, with 5,220 of 7,212 precincts reporting.

Proposition 2 Home equity rules would change and restrictions on borrowing against it would ease. Some protections would also go away: 70 percent for, 30 percent against.

Proposition 3 Gubernatorial appointees would face new term limits. Appointees now serve after their term expires until the governor names a new appointee. This measure sets deadlines, saying appointees can only serve until the last day of the regular session of the Legislature that begins after their term ends: 83 percent for, 17 percent against.

Proposition 4 Would require courts to let the state attorney general know when there is a constitutional challenge to a state statute or law: 66 percent for, 34 percent against.

Proposition 5 This expands the definition of a “professional sports team,” which would allow more sports organizations — such as the PGA, Texas Motor Speedway and minor-league professional sports teams — to hold the 50-50 charitable raffles: 60 percent for, 39 percent against.

Proposition 6 Surviving spouses of first responders killed in the line of duty would receive property tax exemptions: 85 percent for, 15 percent against.

Proposition 7 Would let banks and credit unions hold promotions such as raffles to encourage customers to save their money: 60 percent for, 40 percent against.

Anna Tinsley: 817-390-7610, @annatinsley

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