Elections

Election Day in Texas: Are you heading to the polls to vote?

FWISD bond package, the largest in Tarrant County history, will go before voters on Nov. 7

About $53 million would pay for improvements at Arlington Heights High School for programs like jewelry making classes and the agricultural program.
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About $53 million would pay for improvements at Arlington Heights High School for programs like jewelry making classes and the agricultural program.

Get ready to head to the polls Tuesday.

Among the items on the ballot are a $750 proposed million bond package in the Fort Worth school district, seven constitutional amendments and nearly a dozen local proposals.

“We need people to come out and to vote,” said Stephen Vickers, Tarrant County’s elections administrator.

Polls will be open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Election Day, Tuesday, Nov. 7.

Turnout has been low so far this election.

Just 2.5 percent of registered voters in the state’s 15 largest counties — 244,788 Texans — cast their ballots early in person or by mail, Texas Secretary of State records show.

Less than 2 percent of Tarrant County voters, or 21,460, turned out early.

That’s fewer than the 5.5 percent of voters who turned out early in 2015 for a similar election. That year, less than 500,000 voters, including 42,308 in Tarrant County, cast ballots early, state records show.

“Let’s vote,” Vickers said.

Texans will weigh in on seven constitutional amendments addressing issues ranging from tax exemptions for spouses of first responders killed while on duty to raffles at professional sporting events.

And in Tarrant County, voters from nearly a dozen communities will face issues ranging from the $750 million proposed bond package for the Fort Worth school district to whether Euless should allow liquor stores.

About $53 million would pay for improvements at Arlington Heights High School for programs like jewelry making classes and the agricultural program.

Voting tips

Officials offer a few suggestions to make Election Day easier:

Check your polling place before heading out to vote in case it has changed. And review the sample ballot first. You can find both at access.tarrantcounty.com.

Bring a photo ID to the polls. The seven state-approved photo IDs: Texas driver’s license, Texas Election Identification Certificate, Texas personal identification card, Texas License To Carry a handgun, U.S. military ID card with photo, U.S. citizenship certificate with photo and U.S. passport. Those IDs should not be expired for more than four years.

If you don’t have one of those, you can still vote. Any voter who doesn’t have a photo ID may sign a declaration stating why he or she couldn’t obtain a photo ID. Then they need to show a document such as an original birth certificate, current utility bill, bank statement, paycheck or government document to be cleared to vote.

Try to vote earlier, rather than later, in the day.

“Typically, if you wait until after 5, more people will be getting off work and they may be ready to vote,” Vickers said. “If you wait to the last minute, that’s probably when we are at our busiest.”

Anna Tinsley: 817-390-7610, @annatinsley

In the proposed FWISD $749.7 million bond package about $35 million would pay for improvements at North Side High School. The Fort Worth school district bond package aims to modernize campuses, alleviating crowding and creating more spaces for car

In the proposed FWISD $749.7 million bond package about $34 million would pay for improvements to Dunbar High School. The district wants to modernize learning spaces used for career and tech programs at all the high schools. There are about 18,000

About $53 million would pay for improvements at Arlington Heights High School for programs like jewelry making classes and the agricultural program.

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