Politics & Government

The race for Senate District 9

State Sen. Kelly Hancock faces a Democratic challenger with a familiar last name in his re-election bid.

On Nov. 4, voters will choose between Hancock, R-North Richland Hills, and Democrat Gregory R. Perry, to represent Texas Senate District 9.

“I want to continue serving the community I grew up in, the community where I raised my children,” said Hancock, 50, who owns a small chemical company. “I am running to help ensure a limited, fiscally conservative state budget, prioritizing good schools and needed transportation, water and energy infrastructure.”

Perry, who is not related to Republican Texas Gov. Rick Perry, believes he’s the person voters should choose to represent this district.

“Why am I running? Because nobody else stood up,” the 68-year-old said. “I have nothing to gain and quite a bit to lose by winning this election. My winning this election will gain the voters one ticked off great grandfather in Austin, otherwise they stand to lose public education, public water supplies, health insurance, public highways and anything of value we Texans hold in common.”

The two square off Nov. 4 to determine who will represent the district that includes portions of Arlington, Fort Worth and more than a dozen Northeast Tarrant County cities ranging from Bedford to Watauga.

At stake is a four-year term that pays $7,200 a year.

Early voting runs through Halloween.

Hancock

Hancock was elected to the Texas Senate in 2012 after representing District 91 for six years in the Texas House.

During his tenure, the former Birdville school district president has filed bills favoring mandatory sonograms before abortions, limiting state spending and assisting charter schools.

Top priorities include maintaining fiscal discipline, setting priorities for state spending and focusing on “good schools, water and roads” while limiting “government excess to encourage jobs and private sector investment.”

Key issues in this race, he said, include encouraging job creation by balancing the state government, limiting taxes and government spending and shrinking unneeded government regulations.

“Texas job growth feeds our families, creates opportunity and provides the resources our communities need for the good schools, transportation and water infrastructure we deserve,” he said. “Our leaders prioritize public safety, economic opportunity and the faith, freedom and conservative values that make Texas great.”

Hancock raised nearly $115,000 between July 1 and Sept. 25 and had more than $220,000 on hand, according to the most recent report filed with the Texas Ethics Commission.

Perry

Perry, a retired federal engineer with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, said he and his wife are both retired federal employees.

“We have some savings, Medicare and good supplemental health insurance,” he said. “Between us, we are able to live quietly and modestly.”

He noted that his wife has health issues that have kept her in a walker for more than a year and he is in remission from prostate cancer.

Nonetheless, he’s making his first bid for public office. If elected, he plans to “get to Austin, keep our special legislators away from critical government services, hold on until a younger, healthier, smarter candidate gets elected and go home.”

“If elected, I will spend the next four years expanding your children’s educational opportunities, protecting and enhancing your rights, income and property.”

Perry raised more than $8,000 between July 1 and Sept. 25 and had about $2,100 on hand, recent ethics commission reports show.

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