National

Jack Ruby invited FBI informant to 'watch the fireworks' at parade where JFK was killed

FILE - In this Nov. 22, 1963 file photo, President John F. Kennedy waves from his car in a motorcade in Dallas. Riding with Kennedy are First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy, right, Nellie Connally, second from left, and her husband, Texas Gov. John Connally, far left.
FILE - In this Nov. 22, 1963 file photo, President John F. Kennedy waves from his car in a motorcade in Dallas. Riding with Kennedy are First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy, right, Nellie Connally, second from left, and her husband, Texas Gov. John Connally, far left. AP

On the day President John F. Kennedy was assassinated in Dallas, Texas, the man who later shot Lee Harvey Oswald invited an FBI informant to come and “watch the fireworks” with him at the fateful parade, according to newly released documents.

Jack Ruby — convicted of killing Oswald, who shot Kennedy on Nov. 22, 1963 — then attended the parade with the FBI informant, later revealed to be Bob Vanderslice of Dallas, as reported by CBS.

“He was with Jack Ruby and standing at the corner of the Postal Annex Building facing the Texas School Book Depository Building at the time of the shooting,” reads the FBI document, released as a part of the JFK files.

Oswald shot and killed the president from a sixth floor window in the Depository Building.

After Kennedy was hit, the document says Ruby, who killed Oswald just two days later, “immediately” left and walked in the direction of the Dallas Morning News building.

The FBI did not learn about the comment until March 1977, according to the document, which also said Vanderslice had been providing the IRS “reliable” information on “Dallas bookmakers.”

The Warren Commission found that Ruby acted alone in killing Oswald, according to The New York Times, just as it found Oswald acted alone in killing Kennedy.

Of course, not everyone believes that Oswald was the lone killer of Kennedy, and the information in this report could further conspiracy theories.

Right after Kennedy’s death, Gallup found that 52 percent of Americans thought Oswald was part of a larger conspiracy, with just 29 percent saying he killed the president by himself. The belief that others worked alongside Oswald has never dipped below 50 percent in Gallup polling, and peaked at 81 percent in 1976.

The conspiracies range from a second shooter to the CIA to the Mafia being involved.

The National Archives has been releasing previously-classified documents about Kennedy’s assassination because of a law passed by President George H.W. Bush in 1992. Under that law, the documents were set to have been released automatically on Oct. 26, USA Today reported.

President Donald Trump had the ability to delay the release of the documents, and they have been released in five batches so far, including 10,744 on Friday, according to ABC2.

  Comments