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Where to get your Rosca de Reyes this weekend for Three Kings Day

Epiphany: The tradition of rosca de reyes bread in Mexican culture

Commonly known as "king cakes," these oval shaped cakes takes their name from the biblical three kings or wise men who visited the infant Jesus in Bethlehem on Three Kings Day, Jan. 6. The oval represents a kings’ crown. Mexican and French bakerie
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Commonly known as "king cakes," these oval shaped cakes takes their name from the biblical three kings or wise men who visited the infant Jesus in Bethlehem on Three Kings Day, Jan. 6. The oval represents a kings’ crown. Mexican and French bakerie

If you’re still recovering from the holidays and dropped the ball on getting your Rosca de Reyes, there’s still time to get one.

Rosca de Reyes, or King’s cake, is a circular Mexican bread eaten on January 6 to celebrate Three Kings Day or Epiphany, which is believed to be the day the three wise men visited the infant Jesus.

The round shape symbolizes a crown while the decorative dried fruits acts as its jewels. Baked into the bread is a small figurine of baby Jesus to signify him in hiding.

Here are a few places you can pick up your rosca this weekend:

Anakaren Bakery Seminary Drive: Roscas will be available on Saturday starting at 5 a.m. to 5 p.m. for pickup.

2501 W Seminary Dr., Fort Worth, TX 76115

Esperanza’s Restaurant & Bakery: Esperanza’s will take orders by phone and will have some roscas ready for pickup on a first-come, first-serve basis. It opens at 6:30 a.m. on Saturday.

2122 N Main St., Fort Worth, TX 76164

El Porvenir Panadería: Fresh roscas are available for pickup at 6 a.m. on Saturday.

5031 Wichita St., Fort Worth, TX 76119

Roscas can also be picked up at local grocery stores like El Rancho Supermercado and Fiesta.

Where do you get your Rosca de Reyes? Let us know in the comments.

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Hanaa’ Tameez is the diversity reporter for the Fort Worth Star-Telegram. She covers race, class, culture and identity in Tarrant County. In 2017, Hanaa’ graduated from the Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism with a master’s degree in bilingual journalism. She speaks English, Spanish and Urdu.
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