Fort Worth

Fort Worth Catholic Charities asks for donations for separated children

Undocumented children return from recess at Catholic Charities Fort Worth on February 19, 2014, in Fort Worth, Texas. Catholic Charities works with the government to shelter undocumented youngsters apprehended at the Texas/Mexico border. It also assists in resettling refugees from around the world.
Undocumented children return from recess at Catholic Charities Fort Worth on February 19, 2014, in Fort Worth, Texas. Catholic Charities works with the government to shelter undocumented youngsters apprehended at the Texas/Mexico border. It also assists in resettling refugees from around the world. Star-Telegram file

Fort Worth’s Catholic Charities is accepting donations to help migrant children who have been separated from their families at the border.

The organization is sheltering several of the children at its 26-bed facility. Bishop Michael Olsen of Fort Worth’s Catholic Diocese called the Trump administration’s zero-tolerance policy, meant to be a deterrent to those crossing the border, “sinful.”

Catholic Charities is looking for either monetary donations or items to create activity boxes or hygiene/welcome boxes for the children. Among the items listed are puzzles, activity books, crayons, conditioner, English/Spanish flashcards, hair ties and Chapstick.

Donations can be dropped off at 249 Thornhill Drive in Fort Worth, from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday to Thursday.

Catholic Charities has not released details on how many children are in its care. The shelter is under contract with the federal government’s Office of Refugee Resettlement.

On Wednesday, President Donald Trump signed an executive order rescinding his administration’s policy of separating families at the border. However, there is no plan to reunite the over 2,000 children already taken from their parents with their families. It’s unclear exactly what will happen to families with children who cross the border going forward, but the way the order is written indicates they’ll be locked up with their parents.

Olson, the Fort Worth Bishop, released an updated statement commending Trump on signing the executive order but warned both the president and Congress have work to do to unite the children with their parents and fix the immigration system.

“Our leaders in Congress have a serious responsibility and moral obligation to do so in accord with due and proper respect for legitimate authority,” he said.

Related stories from Fort Worth Star Telegram

  Comments