Dallas

Dallas woman: ‘Black lives matter. Blue lives matter. All lives matter’

When you see multiple people dying in front of you, your out look on life really changes

Noelle Hendrix, Dallas, a witness to last night's shooting in Dallas where 12 police officers were shot, five fatally, talks near a small memorial in Dallas on Friday, July 8, 2016. (Star-Telegram/Max Faulkner)
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Noelle Hendrix, Dallas, a witness to last night's shooting in Dallas where 12 police officers were shot, five fatally, talks near a small memorial in Dallas on Friday, July 8, 2016. (Star-Telegram/Max Faulkner)

Noelle Hendrix returned to the shooting scene Friday morning to leave an arrangement of flowers, stuffed animals and a simple sign that read “Love.”

The arrangement was one of several placed just below a strip of yellow police tape at the corner of Main and Griffin streets, about two blocks from where police were ambushed.

Hendrix fought back tears as she explained how the shooting had altered her perspective on race relations.

She had gone to Dallas Thursday night to protest with others supporting the “Black Lives Matter” movement. She actually arrived too late for most of the march, but just in time to hear the rapid gunfire and then see several police officers fall wounded to the ground.

“When you see multiple people dying in front of you, your outlook changes,” said Hendrix, who lives in the Oak Cliff neighborhood, south of downtown. “I saw multiple races of officers down last night, doing their jobs. Black lives matter. Blue lives matter. All lives matter.”

Friday’s mood was mostly somber in the aftermath of Thursday night’s shooting, which resulted in 12 police officers being shot and five killed. Two civilians were also wounded.

Many passersby near the shooting site sought to help in any way they could. Dozens of people brought water and sandwiches to officers and firefighters and anyone else who seemed to need refreshment.

At the same time, an undeniable tinge of civil unrest remained in the air. At one point, a black man was seen walking past police barricades with his hands high in the air, shouting “Don't shoot!” And just a few feet away, a white man was heard demanding the attention of a television reporter, insisting that the reporter talk about what he described as untruths that had been spread by President Obama and the "Black Lives Matter" campaign.

Also, near a barricade close to the shooting scene, at least two carloads of people drove by on separate occasions, but only a few minutes apart, and young men yelled out the window "F--- the police." Several police seemed to hear the comments, but generally ignored them.

On DART trains Friday morning, there was more room than normal as many regular riders apparently stayed away from downtown.

Trains ran on a mostly regular schedule, but rolled past West End Station, which was inside the Dallas Police Department's roughly 32-square-block designated crime scene.

Riders said there was very little chit-chat about the shootings during the commute.

"It's very sad and disappointing, but I don't know what else to say," said Joshua Curnia, 22, who works at an architectural firm in the West End. Curnia, a daily DART rider, had to get off the train at Akard Station and walk an extra several blocks to his job.

“I expect the mood at work today will be somber,” said Curnia, a summer intern.

At about 7:30 a.m., a DART blue Line train pulled out of Mockingbird Station near the Southern Methodist University campus. Most of the seats on the train were full, but only a smattering of passengers whispered to each other.

“It's usually standing room only this time of the morning,” remarked one man, who was working on Sudoku puzzles on his way to work. “This is light, even for a Friday.”

The protest was scheduled in downtown Dallas after the recent police shootings of Alton Sterling in Baton Rouge and Philando Castile in Falcon Heights, Minn.

It was winding down when the snipers opened fire, targeting police.

Staff writer Deanna Boyd contributed to this report.

The Rev. Jeff Hood, a Baptist pastor and activist, helped organize the demonstration in Dallas on Thursday. He spoke Friday at City Hall about the devastation he feels over the deadly shooting that erupted after the protest.

WFAA cameras captured the harrowing scene Thursday night in downtown Dallas when the first shots were fired after the police protest.

Warning graphic content

Gordon Dickson: 817-390-7796, @gdickson

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