Crime

The NRA gave $7.3 million to schools and youth groups – 3 are in the Fort Worth area

The Fort Worth ISD JROTC Joint Color Guard leads the Juneteenth parade in Forest Hill, TX, Saturday, June 17, 2017. The NRA awarded $7.3 million in grants to schools and youth programs from 2010 through 2016, and the Fort Worth district was among the recipients.
The Fort Worth ISD JROTC Joint Color Guard leads the Juneteenth parade in Forest Hill, TX, Saturday, June 17, 2017. The NRA awarded $7.3 million in grants to schools and youth programs from 2010 through 2016, and the Fort Worth district was among the recipients.

The National Rifle Association Foundation has awarded $7.3 million grants to schools and youth programs since 2010, and three of the recipients are in the Fort Worth area.

Benbrook Middle School's Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps program received a $6,225 non-cash grant in 2015 for "competitive shooting," according to an Associated Press analysis of community grants listed in the NRA Foundation's tax filings.

In Saginaw, the Eagle Mountain 4H Club received a $5,212 cash and non-cash grant ($520 of it in cash) in 2011 for "youth equipment."

Also, a third grant was awarded to a Grapevine organization. That $10,000 grant was awarded in 2010 to the Starkey Hearing Foundation for "youth programs." Starkey provides hearing aids for those in need worldwide, according to the organization's website.

AP began gathering data on NRA Foundation youth donations after the shooting last month at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., where the shooter had belonged to the school's Army JROTC progam that had NRA Foundation grant funding in 2016.

About 500 elementary, middle and high schools nationwide received NRA Foundation grants totaling more than $7.3 million between 2010 and 2016, according to AP. In all, the NRA Foundation donated $61 million to non-profit and government organizations during that time.

Also, the Florida school board that oversees the Parkland school determined this week that it would no longer accept grants from the NRA Foundation.

However, many other schools that receive money from the group say they have no plans to back away, according to AP. Much of the school money goes to competitive shooting programs that would struggle to stay afloat without the NRA’s help.

Gordon Dickson: 817-390-7796; @gdickson

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