Weatherford News

Creativity with cardboard unveiled at WISD event

Quinn Stankavage, a Quest student from Crockett Elementary, made a basketball shooting game called “Indonesia Basketball” named for the country he was studying about in class.
Quinn Stankavage, a Quest student from Crockett Elementary, made a basketball shooting game called “Indonesia Basketball” named for the country he was studying about in class. Weatherford Star-Telegram

It was an evening showcasing creativity in cardboard.

Weatherford ISD’s gifted and talented program - also known as Quest - saw close to 200 students, 3rd through 6th grades, come together Monday evening to display arcade games they made from cardboard.

“These are gifted kids and this project allows them to utilize their creativity,” said Carmen Luke, one of three gifted and talented specialist responsible for seven WISD campuses. “This also helps them look ‘outside themselves’ because we’re donating proceeds from this evenings event to a charity.”

That charity, for the second consecutive year, has been the Weatherford/Parker County Animal Shelter.

“Programs like these are wonderful when it comes to training the next generation of movers and shakers,” said Dustin Deel, director of animal services for the shelter. “Looking at their creativity, I can’t help but wonder what happens to adult’s creativity. As an adult, we apply so many rules to life’s problems that we lose that elementary creativity.”

Deel said the kids are solving problems they don’t even realize they are solving.

“I think we all need to learn from these kids and approach life’s problems with as much excitement,” Deel added. “It is truly humbling that the students of WISD choose the Weatherford Parker County Animal Shelter to be the benefiting charity for this event.”

Deel said often times grown adults will turn their heads to the problems faced in the animal services industry.

“But the kids really do want to make a difference,” Deel said. “The animals that come to the shelter are the communities problem and the kids know this. That fact that WISD children care so much about giving a second chance to these lost animals makes me feel great about the future generations to come.”

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