Weatherford Star-Telegram

Jesus didn’t play laser tag, but it’s part of Passover Experience in Parker County

A giant Jesus statue makes the location of Capernaum First Century Village hard to miss on the road between Peaster and Poolville in Parker County. Photo by Terry Evans
A giant Jesus statue makes the location of Capernaum First Century Village hard to miss on the road between Peaster and Poolville in Parker County. Photo by Terry Evans Special to the Star-Telegram

Tammy Lane admits that laser tag has nothing to do with Jesus.

But one of two new additions to Capernaum First Century Village is designed to add fun to the Passover Experience, a religious-themed production at the movie-set style site about an hour from Fort Worth, northwest of Weatherford.

Lane also hopes the attraction will help fund the annual Easter-inspired walk through the Bible, as well as other events staged by Tammy Lane Productions at the complex.

“Laser tag is just an added fun thing that helps pay for all the rest,” Lane said. “It’s set in the town we built for the Apocalypse, and it accommodates 20 people at a time.”

Folks making a return trek to Peaster will recognize the quaint town of Judgemint, where Lane and her cohorts introduced Apocalypse Experience last Halloween. Adventurous guests may hunt one another through several of the buildings — including the vertigo-inducing crooked house — in 10-minute laser-tag games.

Passover Experience in Capernaum Village is about nine miles north of Weatherford at 10700 Farm Road 970, just north of Peaster. The entrance is on East Dry Creek Road. Performances are from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. April 7-9 and 14-15. Visit www.passoverexperience.com to learn more and to purchase tickets.

The other addition to Passover Experience — The Path of Plagues — takes guests on a darker diversion. For 20 to 25 minutes, guests follow “time guides” through depictions of seven of the 10 plagues that God sent to force Egypt to release its Hebrew slaves, Lane said.

“The last five plagues are reenacted,” she said.

The1,000-or-so-foot path is darkly dramatic by showing Hebrew slaves being mistreated by their Egyptian overlords, and such terrors inflicted on the oppressors as water sources turning to blood, a disastrous hail storm, and the death of Egypt’s first born. But director Jade Lane, Tammy’s daughter, gave it a dash of humor, too, her mom said.

“At the beginning, the time guides react kind of comically to the first of the plagues,” Tammy Lane said.

Lane added that all the Biblical stories at Capernaum are brought to life by actors who are dedicated to giving guests emotional experiences.

“We want people to know why Jesus celebrated Passover, why we celebrate it now as well as Easter, and how it all ties together,” she said. “We have a fabulous actor named Jeddidiah Wick playing Jesus this year.”

Wick presides over the reenactment of the Last Supper in Capernaum’s reproduction of the Upper Room, Lane said. Guests get a taste of what Jesus and his disciples ate when they take advantage of the Seder tasting in Capernaum’s pavilion.

Combined with the Majestic Statue Garden and the First Century Village Marketplace, Passover Experience easily could occupy guests for more than an hour. Everything is wheelchair accessible.

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