Northeast Tarrant

Baylor presents ‘great saves’ awards to Grapevine EMS

GRAPEVINE Baylor Regional Medical Center at Grapevine representatives recently showed their appreciation to Grapevine EMS/Grapevine Fire Department by bestowing the EMSuper Star award.

In Jan. 2013, the hospital began celebrating the “great saves” that occur between the hospital, EMS and fire personnel by implementing the award.

At a July 15 City Council meeting, the Fire Department recognized the EMS providers as partners in providing care.

Highlighted were two “great saves.”

In April, Grapevine EMS responded to a severe traumatic injury. Upon arrival, EMS found the patient unresponsive, but still breathing. Proper precautions to protect the neck and spine were used to prevent paralysis.

According to hospital officials, if it wasn’t for the immediate response by Grapevine EMS “this individual most likely would not have survived or would have faced severe debilitating deficits.”

“We would like to honor them for their fast, efficient, competent and compassionate care,” said Baylor Grapevine President Steve Newton, who was on hand for the presentation.

Newton told the City Countil that the patient was a child, adding that “nothing is more challenging than a small child who is critically injured.”

“I’m honored to present Grapevine EMS as our second quarter of 2014 recipient of the EMS SuperStar award,” he said.

Grapevine medics and crew recognized include Capt. Mike Thompson, Brad Feldpausch, Jared Harding, Eric Sellers and Joe Yarbrough.

Also recognized was a group of Grapevine medics and crew for “quick thinking and heroic efforts in saving the life of a stroke patient.”

In March, Grapevine EMS responded to an individual with signs and symptoms of a stroke. Symptoms included sudden onset of feeling dizzy and unable to speak. Grapevine EMS activated Code Stroke while en route to the hospital ensuring the stroke team was ready upon arrival.

The patient was assessed and determined to be a candidate for t-PA — the only FDA approved drug for the treatment of stroke. The faster the drug is given, the better the outcome. The patient’s door to needle time was 22 minutes, much less than the national standard for treatment. The patient was discharged home three days after the stroke without any deficits.

Grapevine medics and crew recognized include Capt. Mike Thompson, Jared Harding, Dennis Hill and Ranier Mundy.

The patient, Jan Reinhart, was among the first patients treated at the hospital by tele-medicine. Reinhart had no history of strokes until she had a sudden seizure. She was brought to Baylor Grapevine and has made a full recovery.

She was home in Grapevine and her brother was visiting when she began acting strangely, including the inability to talk.

“It was like the TV speaker was in my head blaring and echoing,” she said. “Then I went into a full-blown seizure.”

She was told her stroke “was one of the worst ones you can have.”

Hospital officials said she was fortunate that the hospital has a new way to rapidly identify and treat strokes using telemedicine — a medical robot. The new robot signals the introduction of tele-medicine in their emergency department.

“They not only saved my life, they got me to where I have no damage because I received that clotbuster so quickly,” Reinhart said. “That tele-medicine is just awesome.”

Newton said getting her to the hospital in a timely matter was critical, too.

“If it wasn’t for the immediate response by Grapevine EMS, these patients most likely would not have survived or would have faced severe debilitating deficits,” Newton said. “We would like to honor them for their fast, efficient, competent, and compassionate care.”

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