Mansfield News

Sake Hibachi opening second Mansfield location

Sake Hibachi Sushi and Bar plans to open a second location in Mansfield at the northwest corner of East Broad Street and Texas 360. A second restaurant and two retail shops are also planned.
Sake Hibachi Sushi and Bar plans to open a second location in Mansfield at the northwest corner of East Broad Street and Texas 360. A second restaurant and two retail shops are also planned. lwinter@star-telegram.com

Sake Hibachi Sushi & Bar plans to open a second location in Mansfield, this time at the northwest corner of East Broad Street and Texas 360.

The proposed restaurant will be part of a larger 9,572-square-foot building that will feature a second sit-down restaurant and two retail shops.

The site plan for the development was approved by the City Council 5-2 On Feb. 12 with Councilmen Cory Hoffman and Stephen Lindsey voting against it.

Felix Wong, who represented the owner, Wendy Wenquin Lu, said they plan to start construction as soon as possible and get it open within 10 months.

The Japanese style restaurant will be highlighted by a tower at the front entrance that will be lit by LED lighting while windows will let in natural light during the day. This restaurant could have a different name than the original Sake Hibachi Sushi & Bar that’s at East Debbie Lane and U.S. 287. There are also plans for a Thai restaurant next door.

“I want to break ground tomorrow,” Wong said after the meeting. “This is an important corner. This will be a high quality sit-down restaurant. It sets the tone and the bar for the development and hopefully this corner of the city.”

The 1.4-acre site was subdivided so the lots with the restaurants would be separate from the retail. That way the restaurants will be more than 300 feet from Walnut Ridge Baptist Church and the Newman International Academy of Mansfield, allowing them to serve alcohol without a variance.

Natural Grocers was originally going to anchor the development at the corner of Cannon Drive and East Broad Street but Wong confirmed that the grocery store pulled out and would not be coming to that location. Market Street is under construction now just east of Mansfield High School. Plans for a Lidl German grocery store just east of Mary Orr Intermediate School were also withdrawn recently.

Queensgate draws fire again

The proposed Queensgate neighborhood continues to face opposition from residents who say the infrastructure in northwest Mansfield can’t accommodate 36 new homes.

The roads, such as Newt Patterson Road and Cardinal Road, aren’t big enough to handle the traffic, said Brian Butcher, who lives in the Twin Creeks neighborhood to the north.

In addition, flooding concerns delayed the project for more than a year while the developer worked with the Federal Emergency Management Agency.

The developer assured the council that the development would not make the flooding worse in the area.

The council approved Queensgate unanimously on second reading. The council encouraged the developer to continue meeting with the residents before the final vote Feb. 26.

Butcher said many of his neighbors oppose the development.

“I can tell you that there are a lot of people who will be here at the next meeting,” he said. “Not every blade of grass has to be torn out for concrete.”

The bigger problem for Butcher is that somebody tore down his fence and ran a bulldozer on his property. They tore down trees and rutted up the land. He plans to file a lawsuit against whoever caused damage.

The developer said his workers had nothing to do with the damage on his land.

Councilman Larry Broseh said the council’s responsibility is to find the best value and use for land.

“We cannot stop progress and growth in the city,” Broseh said. “Sometimes it’s unpleasant. Sometimes we’d much rather see the countryside. But unless we have the pockets to purchase that land, the developer can do that. We want the best quality and the best aesthetics that we can get.”

Combating erosion

Major streambank stabilization repairs are coming to Hogpen Branch Creek behind homes on Brookfield Lane. The work is necessary to combat erosion.

The council hired RLM Earthco for $530,000 to do the five-month project. Workers will stabilize about 250 linear feet of creekbed.

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