Mansfield News

German grocer Lidl looking at adding store on Debbie Lane

Brendan Proctor, the U.S. chief executive of Lidl, speaks to reporters during the grand opening of a Lidl grocery store, Thursday, June 15, 2017, in Virginia Beach, Va. The German global discount supermarket chain has proposed opening a store in Mansfield.
Brendan Proctor, the U.S. chief executive of Lidl, speaks to reporters during the grand opening of a Lidl grocery store, Thursday, June 15, 2017, in Virginia Beach, Va. The German global discount supermarket chain has proposed opening a store in Mansfield. AP

German grocer Lidl has proposed a 36,000-square-foot store on East Debbie Lane near Matlock Road that would be the fifth grocery store at that intersection.

The City Council got its first look at the Lidl store Monday, approving it unanimously on first reading. Council members wanted more details when the project returns for a second vote July 10.

Lidl would join Kroger, Walmart Neighborhood Market, Aldi and Sprouts at the busy East Debbie Lane and Matlock Road intersection.

Lidl is growing fast throughout the United States with four openings planned in Virginia and North Carolina on July 13, CNBC reports. With the new openings, Lidl will have 14 locations in the United States with another 100 planned in the next year, CNBC reports. The store has 10,000 locations in 28 countries.

The Community of Hope United Methodist Church owned the land adjacent to its worship center where the grocery store is proposed.

Lead pastor Jay Fraze said they originally planned a smaller strip center with multiple tenants. But that changed when Lidl showed interest in the site.

“They made us an offer we couldn’t refuse,” Fraze said. “The company thinks there’s enough growth in the area so there will be plenty of market share.”

Councilman Terry Moore, who was sworn in Monday, said he’d like to see more grocery stores on the west side of town.

“We’ve got a whole bunch on the east side,” Moore said.

Townhomes project

A proposal for 77 townhomes on 16 acres along South Main Street got a lukewarm reception from the council. The council voted 6-1 to approve the Main Street Village on first reading Monday but isn’t sold on it yet.

Councilman Larry Broseh, who was sworn in for another term Monday, voted against the proposal.

“I’m struggling with this because I don’t see that this is a fit,” Broseh said.

All the council members want assurances that the townhomes don’t turn into rentals or Airbnb units.

“If that’s the direction that this might go I want everybody to look at this with eyes wide open,” Moore said.

The developers from Skorburg Company said they would return for a second reading July 10 with more detailed covenants and restrictions that the homeowners would have to follow, including prohibiting Airbnb rentals and rentals longer than 12 months.

Skorburg built the Colby Crossing project at Matlock Road and Cannon Drive and is building the Cypress Crossing project near Matlock and East Debbie Lane.

Councilman Cory Hoffman said he would like to see a higher starting price than the estimated $250,000. He’d also like to have more character within the project.

The project has an on-site dog park and playground on the south side of Sherman Drive. The townhomes will be wedged between South Main Street and Berryhill Drive. There’s also a large open space lot in the floodplain to the north of the townhomes.

There will be a mandatory homeowners association to upkeep the common grounds.

The project is meant as a transition between the single-family homes to the east and the industrial uses on the west side of South Main Street.

The townhomes will be a minimum of 1,618 square feet. All the units will have garages and there will be parking spaces for guests.

Treatment plant

New homes and businesses coming to Mansfield mean it’s time to expand the Bud Ervin Water Treatment plant.

The council approved a $2.4 million contract to Red River Construction to install a new hypochlorite generator at the treatment center on Newt Patterson Road. They will also replace one of the hypochlorite storage tanks that has a leak.

One generator will be added in the future to bring the treatment center up to full capacity.

Mansfield has been able to delay this project for a few years by encouraging residents to conserve water.

The council awarded a separate contract to Alan Plumber Associates to oversee the construction at a cost of $151,900.

Also as part of the project, the water tower on East Debbie Lane will be repainted and recoated with a new primer and paint.

As part of the repaint, the state championship signs will be removed. The city had decided not to put them back up because there are so many high schools in Mansfield ISD now.

It costs $40,000 to paint the championship logos on the tower.

Mayor David Cook said the water towers have historically recognized the Mansfield High School girls basketball championships but haven’t recognized the other recent state titles.

Cook said he’d like to see more dialogue about getting the state titles back up there.

“I think something could be done there,” Cook said. “I think it should at least be discussed.”

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