Fort Worth

Fort Worth zoning board rejects plan for east side concrete recycling plant

Concrete chunks await recycling at the Arlington landfill in August 2004. Recycling breaks the pieces in to aggregate about the size of a quarter that can be used to make more concrete. A zoning request for a concrete recycling operation in east Fort Worth was rejected by the city Zoning Comission on Wednesday, June 8, 2016.
Concrete chunks await recycling at the Arlington landfill in August 2004. Recycling breaks the pieces in to aggregate about the size of a quarter that can be used to make more concrete. A zoning request for a concrete recycling operation in east Fort Worth was rejected by the city Zoning Comission on Wednesday, June 8, 2016. Star-Telegram archives

The city’s Zoning Commission on Wednesday emphatically rejected a rezoning request that could have allowed a concrete recycling plant to be built off East First Street near Oakland Boulevard.

The commission voted 9-0 to recommend to the Fort Worth City Council that it deny with prejudice the zoning request from the Jane White 2011 Irrevocable Trust and West Fork Partners L.P. The request was to change the zoning on nearly 400 acres from commercial and multifamily uses to heavy industrial and the specific use for a concrete recycling plant.

“With prejudice” means the landowner, Dallas businessman Wallace Hall, may not resubmit the project for consideration for a year. Hall’s agent at the meeting asked the commission to deny the project “without prejudice,” meaning it could have come back to the commission at any time.

Before the meeting, Hall had said he would withdraw the zoning request for now because of mounting opposition from the surrounding neighborhoods. However, Commissioner Charles Edmonds, in making the motion to reject the proposal, said he wanted to make sure the case would not resurface.

Edmonds said the commission received more than 1,000 letters opposing the project and petitions signed by 1,000 people.

“The sentiment is clear,” Edmonds said. “Hopefully by then, there will be a better solution. Something good may come out of this.”

Eastside residents packed City Council chambers for the zoning hearing.

Fred Fernandez, president of the adjacent White Lake Hills Neighborhood Association, said the project was not the right kind of development for the east side. The plant would be “a giant leap in the wrong direction,” he said. “We’re against it now and at anytime in the future.”

The council is scheduled to vote on the case on June 21.

  Comments