Fort Worth

Fort Worth, Metroplex rank 62 in well-being survey

The North Texas area ranked 86th for physical, which measured good health and enough energy to get things done daily, in a Gallup-Healthways survey.
The North Texas area ranked 86th for physical, which measured good health and enough energy to get things done daily, in a Gallup-Healthways survey. File photo

Residents of Fort Worth, Arlington and Dallas are motivated to reach goals and like what they do each day, but feel as if they’re doing it alone, according to the most recent community well-being survey published by Gallup-Healthways.

The three cities ranked No. 62 out of 190 cities nationwide that were surveyed by phone.

The overall ranking was derived from five categories — purpose, social, financial, community and physical. North Texas did best in purpose, 27th, which measured how much people like what what they do each day and their motivation to achieve goals.

But the three cities did worst, 95th, in the social category, which measured supportive relationships and love in life. Respondants answered questions measuring social well-being, which didn’t ask about love specifically or make a distinction between romantic and platonic love, Healthways spokeswoman Susan Frankle said in an email.

“The ‘love in your life’ language is the description of what we are ‘getting at’ when we measure social well-being. We ask respondents to agree/disagree on a five-point scale,” Frankle said. “Collectively the answers to these questions help determine whether people have ‘supportive relationships and love in their life.’ 

The three cities ranked 82nd in financial, which measured how people manage economic life to reduce stress and increase security, and 64th for community, which was a measure of how much people like where they live, feeling safe and community pride.

The area ranked 86th for physical, which measured good health and enough energy to get things done daily.

Other Texas cities made the list, with Austin ranking 17th overall, El Paso 31st, Corpus Christi 35th, Houston 46th and Temple 94th.

Naples, Fla., ranked No. 1 on the list, while Charleston, W.Va., ranked last.

“Improving and sustaining high well-being is vital to any population’s overall health and economy,” Frankle said.

Frankle said scientific research shows high well-being correlates with key health outcomes, workplace performance measures and business outcomes.

The report included rankings of six health access metrics from 2008 to 2015, including the ability to afford food and healthcare. The McAllen, Edinburg and Mission area of Texas had the highest food insecurity.

In the number of people with a personal doctor category, El Paso had the next to lowest, and the McAllen area had the lowest.

Texas cities were in the lowest rankings for dentist visits as well, with 48.8 percent of respondents going to the dentist in 2015 in the McAllen area, and 48.6 percent of respondents going in the Beaumont-Port Arthur area.

More than 350,000 people responded by phone to the nationwide survey from January 2014 to December 2015.

Questions from the survey that determine ‘supportive relationships and love in their life’

Research shows high well-being linked with lower rates of healthcare and use, lower absenteeism and higher productivity in the workplace, lower obesity and onset of disease, employee engagement, customer engagement, turnover and workplace safety, said Healthways spokeswoman Susan Frankle

  • Your relationship with your spouse, partner or closest friend is stronger than ever.
  • Your friends and family give you positive energy every day.
  • You always make time for regular trips or vacations with friends and family.
  • Someone in your life always encourages you to be healthy.
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