Fort Worth

Grand jury declines to indict Fort Worth officer in shooting

Maurisa Goldston, right, is comforted by a family friend after an anti-police brutality march in Fort Worth on May 30, 2015. Her brother, Kelvin Goldston, was fatally shot by a Fort Worth police officer on May 11, 2015.
Maurisa Goldston, right, is comforted by a family friend after an anti-police brutality march in Fort Worth on May 30, 2015. Her brother, Kelvin Goldston, was fatally shot by a Fort Worth police officer on May 11, 2015. Star-Telegram archives

A Tarrant County grand jury has declined to indict a Fort Worth police officer who said he shot a 30-year-old man to protect the life of another officer.

The grand jury’s decision was handed up Tuesday.

Kelvin Goldston, 30, was fatally wounded during a narcotics surveillance operation at a residence in the 6000 block of Wheaton Drive in Wedgwood, police have said.

Golston had backed his pickup out of the driveway of the house when a marked patrol car pulled in front of him and an unmarked police vehicle pulled up behind him.

Two officers approached the pickup — a uniformed officer from the front and a plainclothes narcotics officer from the rear — when Goldston put the truck in reverse and accelerated backward, officials said.

The truck struck the plainclothes officer as she tried to dive out of its path, officials said. The officer approaching from the front fired his service weapon. Goldston was shot more than a dozen times, according to the Tarrant County medical examiner’s office.

Fort Worth police have not identified either officer. The plainclothes officer was not seriously injured.

Daryl Washington, an attorney representing the Goldston family, said Tuesday that he made a presentation to the grand jury.

“The police officer broke the window and then shot Kelvin Goldston,” Washington said. “You have an eyewitness who was interviewed after this happened. What that person saw happen, none of that testimony was taken into account at all. That in itself was enough to raise probable cause. If you have conflicting testimony from witnesses, it’s not the grand jury’s job to decide credibility; that’s a job for a trial jury.

“The evidence pointed toward this police officer being indicted.”

Goldston had 14 convictions dating back to 2006.

This includes information from Star-Telegram archives.

Mitch Mitchell: 817-390-7752, @mitchmitchel3

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