Fort Worth

Rainwater’s non-profit builds 100th garden at school in Carrollton

Rebecca Guirguis paints tree stump seats at the school on Saturday.
Rebecca Guirguis paints tree stump seats at the school on Saturday. Laura Buckman/Special to the Sta

Fort Worth businessman and philanthropist Richard Rainwater died in September, but his legacy lives on.

Volunteers at Junkins Elementary School in Carrollton spent the day building the 100th garden under his nonprofit foundation’s REAL School Gardens program.

The gardens, which provide fresh fruit and vegetables, are outdoor learning centers for kids in 11 North Texas school districts. The first garden was built in Fort Worth and the program is being expanded into the Mid-Atlantic with four more regions expected open in the next five years.

“While every garden we build is special, I’m particularly proud of this event because it stands as a mile-marker for the organization and all of our school and corporate partners,” said REAL School Gardens CEO Jeanne McCarty.

Junkins’ parents, teachers and students spent Saturday creating the 7,000-square-foot garden in Carrollton.

“It’s a lot of work, but every child deserves to get out of their desks and into an outdoor classroom,” McCarty said.

  Comments