Fort Worth

Fort Worth police officer no-billed in fatal shooting

Veronica Castillo, rear left in sunglasses, joins a protest of police shootings of minorities on April 15, 2015. Castillo’s brother, Daniel Brumley, was fatally shot by a Fort Worth police officer.
Veronica Castillo, rear left in sunglasses, joins a protest of police shootings of minorities on April 15, 2015. Castillo’s brother, Daniel Brumley, was fatally shot by a Fort Worth police officer. Star-Telegram archives

A Tarrant County grand jury has declined to indict a police officer who fatally wounded a 27-year-old north Fort Worth resident who had stabbed the officer, according to court officials.

Fort Worth police officer Chris Jones shot and killed Daniel Brumley after pulling him over on Jan. 17 in the 1700 block of N.E. 36th Street. A scuffle began, and Brumley stabbed Jones in the leg.

Brumley, the father of seven, was shot multiple times, according to the Tarrant County medical examiner’s office.

Jones was treated at a hospital.

“I was told it was a superficial wound,” Brumley’s sister Veronica Castillo said Thursday. “Why weren’t the officer’s hospital records pulled that showed he had a superficial wound?”

In a news release, Sharen Wilson, the Tarrant County district attorney, said she agreed with the grand jury, which handed up its decision on Wednesday.

“This incident centered on an aggressive repeat offender high on methamphetamines and marijuana who stabbed a police officer performing his normal duties,” Wilson’s statement said. “The officer defended himself in a justified manner. The attorney for Mr. Brumley’s family was given the opportunity to address the grand jurors. When presented with the unbiased facts, the grand jury was resolute in its ultimate decision.”

Brumley’s family and other residents of Fort Worth’s north side community have protested the way the case was handled and participated in protests this year about police-involved shootings.

“We were told the drugs in his system could have been a day or two old,” Castillo said. “The only thing they took under consideration is his past. I know how my brother is. This wasn’t the first time he had been pulled over. It wouldn’t have been the first time he went to jail. He has never resisted. He always laughed it off.”

The family’s attorney, Eloy Sepulveda, said he appreciated the opportunity to make a presentation before the grand jury but wished it had done more good.

“It was very disappointing,” he said. “I made a passionate plea for the grand jury to indict [the officer]. It just didn’t happen.”

Sepulveda said Brumley’s case was not an isolated incident.

“I do believe this type of thing is happening to Hispanics quite a bit,” Sepulveda said. “Hispanics comprise more than 20 percent of the population in Fort Worth. It seems as though police do not know how to handle situations with people other than shooting them.”

Staff writer Monica S. Nagy contributed to this report, which contains information from Star-Telegram archives.

Mitch Mitchell: 817-390-7752, @mitchmitchel3

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