Fort Worth

Tarrant County under severe thunderstorm warning; tornado warning in Dallas County

PSA: Turn around don’t drown

Flooding is one of the leading causes of weather related fatalities in the U.S., according to the National Weather Service. On average, flooding claims nearly 90 lives each year. More than half of these deaths occur in motor vehicles when people a
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Flooding is one of the leading causes of weather related fatalities in the U.S., according to the National Weather Service. On average, flooding claims nearly 90 lives each year. More than half of these deaths occur in motor vehicles when people a

The National Weather Service has issued a severe thunderstorm warning for Tarrant and Denton counties and a severe thunderstorm watch for Tarrant County and surrounding areas for much of Sunday.

The severe thunderstorm warning in Tarrant and Denton counties is until 4 p.m. and means that the threat of dangerous storms is imminent. A tornado warning was also issued for Dallas County until 4 p.m.

The areas affected include Fort Worth, Arlington, Grand Prairie, Denton, Lewisville, Flower Mound, Mansfield, Euless, Bedford, Grapevine, Haltom City, Keller, Hurst, Burleson, Southlake, Watauga, Colleyville, Benbrook, Corinth and Saginaw.

Oncor’s outage map showed more than 50,000 customers without power in Tarrant County. Strong winds measured at 65 mph were moving through the area, according to the National Weather Service.

The main threats to your Father’s Day celebrations are high winds, large hail and torrential rains in some areas that could lead to localized flooding, according to Matt Stalley, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Fort Worth.

Some areas that saw significant rainfall earlier in the day are particularly at risk for flooding due to ground saturation, Stalley said.

The thunderstorm watch is expected to expire at 8 p.m. as storms taper off, drift south and night falls, weather service forecasters predicted.

Areas east of the Dallas-Fort Worth area are expected to see fewer storms that are less severe, Stalley said.

The setup is typical for this time of year, Stalley said. It’s warm and humid and the developing storms have plenty of energy to draw from, Stalley said. Storms coming out of the west are expected to grow in intensity and coverage throughout the day and into the evening, he said.

“Within the Metroplex we’ve recovered pretty well from this morning’s rainfall and temperatures are warming, putting us at risk for strong storms this afternoon, evening and tonight,” Stalley said.

The tornado risk is low, but North Texans could see wind gusts as high as 75 mph and hail possibly up to 3 inches in diameter, according to weather service predictions. Around 1:40 p.m. a line of strong thunderstorms was moving east from Graham toward Mineral Wells and Decatur, Stalley said.

“We’re not expecting anything really widespread like we saw last weekend,” Stalley said. “Father’s Day could be interrupted this afternoon. Just keep an eye out. This does not mean plans need to be canceled or totally ruined. Just have a way close-by to keep up with the weather.”

On June 9, strong winds in Dallas caused a crane to collapse into an apartment complex. One person died and six others were injured.

The storms last weekend also caused power outages for thousands in the Metroplex. About 5,000 people did not have power in the Fort Worth area at 5 p.m. June 9, and about 300,000 people were without power in the Dallas area, according to Oncor’s outage map.

This story includes information from Star-Telegram archives.

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