Fort Worth

Baseball, softball-size hail in forecast. When will severe storms make it to DFW?

Video shows hail in northeast Tarrant County

Storms packing hail the size of tennis balls in some neighborhoods pounded North Texas during the evening of March 24, 2019, smashing out windows to dozens of vehicles and damaging homes.
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Storms packing hail the size of tennis balls in some neighborhoods pounded North Texas during the evening of March 24, 2019, smashing out windows to dozens of vehicles and damaging homes.

Large hail, damaging winds and an isolated tornado are all possible late Wednesday afternoon and evening.

When will it arrive in the Dallas-Fort Worth area?

The storms should move into Tarrant County between 5 p.m. and 7 p.m.

And if commuters are caught in the storms before they can get home?

“You definitely need to have a plan,” said National Weather Service meteorologist Patricia Sanchez of where to take shelter.

A strong cap of warm air in the atmosphere that has been suppressing storms is expected to go away this afternoon as the dry line approaches.

Once that occurs, storms will start developing most likely west of Fort Worth in Palo Pinto or Parker County and move eastward.

Some models have also suggested storms could move in from the south, Sanchez said.

The Storm Prediction Center has placed all of the DFW area under an enhanced risk for severe storms (3 on a scale of 5) that includes hail ranging from baseball to softball size.

“Two relatively dense corridors of convective coverage — and associated large-hail potential — are evident: near the frontal zone from the Texas Panhandle to southern Kansas, and ahead of the dryline from portions of southern Oklahoma through south-central Texas,” the Storm Prediction Center said.

“Significant 2-inch or greater hailstones are possible in each area from supercells in early stages of the convective evolution. The threat will transition unevenly more toward wind with time, and a few tornadoes also are possible...” the Storm Prediction Forecast Center said.

While the entire DFW area is at risk for large hail, it’s impossible to predict where the large hail stones will fall.

“Not everybody will get it,” Sanchez said.

There’s also a severe storm threat east of Dallas this afternoon ahead of the main line of storms.

And the scattered showers, which haven’t been severe Wednesday morning, could also continue before the main event arrives.

The storms should move out of the DFW area by midnight with sunny and dry weather for the Easter weekend.

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