Fort Worth

The folks behind Wild Acre Brewing want to open their own restaurant and brewery

Brewers say new legislation could help them be more innovative

Brian Burton, co-owner of Hop & Sting Brewing Co., explains why proposal in the Texas Legislature could help benefit breweries. Senate Bill 312 and House Bill 672 would allow beer-to-go sales from Texas craft breweries.
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Brian Burton, co-owner of Hop & Sting Brewing Co., explains why proposal in the Texas Legislature could help benefit breweries. Senate Bill 312 and House Bill 672 would allow beer-to-go sales from Texas craft breweries.

Almost three years after Wild Acre Brewing opened its brewery and taproom, the founders behind the local beer think now is the time to open a full food-service restaurant.

The proposed plan is to open the brewery and restaurant at 6479 Camp Bowie Blvd., in a building that once housed a Kroger but has sat empty for the past 15 years. The 57,000 square-foot building is currently being redeveloped, and part of the space will be as a shared office concept. Wild Acre Brewing wants to take 3,000 square feet of the building to have a small brewery and restaurant.

“We’re doing it just because we’d love to get a space in the community … in addition to the people who love to come to the brewery on the weekends,” said founder John Pritchett. “It’s an important piece for our growing brand, and we’re excited about its potential.”

Pritchett said the space will have the capacity to brew its own beer, but will only to serve at the restaurant itself. If Wild Acre fans want to take home a six-pack, they’ll still have to go to the distribution location on El Paso Street.

The proposed restaurant is in the very early stages of development. It’s still going through the zoning and permitting processes, though it’s likely the Fort Worth City Council will approve its zoning application at its meeting next week. And development is so early that it hasn’t finalized a food concept yet, so no word on what kind of fare you’ll find if you want to visit.

In spite of this, neighbors in the area are hopeful. At a Fort Worth Zoning Commission hearing Wednesday, Wild Acre’s attorney Justin Light presented letters of support from surrounding neighborhood associations, surrounding businesses and even the Montessori School across the street.

“The neighborhood is eager to get something in there,” Pritchett said.

No timeline has been set for opening, but Pritchett said if everything goes well, the restaurant will hopefully be open by the end of the year.

Carla Jimenez covers breaking business news and commercial retail development. Born and raised in Euless, she took a detour in the Midwest for a few years, but she’s back in the land of football, barbecue and Dr Pepper.


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