Fort Worth

DFW may get a break from rain next week

Lightning arcs to the ground in a four-second time exposure as storms pass through southwest Fort Worth Tuesday night, May 26, 2015.
Lightning arcs to the ground in a four-second time exposure as storms pass through southwest Fort Worth Tuesday night, May 26, 2015. Star-Telegram

It’s rained 14 of 25 days this month in Dallas-Fort Worth, and while there’s a decent chance for storms through Monday, the endless rounds of rain may taper off early next week.

At least for a little while. Maybe.

“As we get toward the end of May, it looks like we may get a break in what has been a very persistent pattern,” said Tom Bradshaw, meteorologist in charge at the National Weather Service in Fort Worth.

However, the Climate Prediction Center’s eight- to 14-day outlook calls for near-normal precipitation, and the one-month outlook foresees a wetter-than-normal June.

“It may not be as vigorous and as intense as what we’ve seen this month, but it doesn’t look like we’re heading into a dry multiweek interlude,” Bradshaw said.

Dallas/Fort Worth Airport has reported 11.88 inches of rain this month, the fourth-wettest May on record. There’s still a chance to break the record of 13.67 inches set in May 1982.

It’s also the fifth-wettest start to a year on record, with 26.55 inches since Jan. 1. The rain has filled lakes and rivers across much of Texas, essentially ending the drought.

“It has just been a godsend,” Bradshaw said. “From the Panhandle to Wichita Falls through our area and into Austin and the Hill Country, things have changed dramatically. There are still some lakes that need water in far West Texas, but everyone is better off than they were 60 days ago.”

The heavy rains have come with a price. North Texas alone has had at least 47 confirmed tornadoes, and flooding has been widespread, from Dallas to Austin to Houston.

“I can’t recall any other time where storms covered the entire state with flooding and violent weather,” said Mark Hanna, a spokesman for the Insurance Council of Texas, an industry trade group, who said it will take time for insurance adjusters to tally the damage.

State Climatologist John Nielsen-Gammon cautions that June is historically the wettest month in Texas, so nothing guarantees the rain will stop.

“It will eventually end,” Nielsen-Gammon said. “I can guarantee you that.”

Bill Hanna, 817-390-7698

Twitter: @fwhanna

A soggy beginning

The wettest starts to a year on record in Dallas-Fort Worth.

1957: 31.62 inches of rain

1990: 29.15

1922: 27.42

2008: 26.74

2015: 26.55 (through May 25)

Source: National Weather Service in Fort Worth

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