Fort Worth

Looking for work? This Fort Worth job fair promises at least 3,000 job opportunities

Job fairs are one way companies needing employees can reach out to the greatest number of people at the same time.
Job fairs are one way companies needing employees can reach out to the greatest number of people at the same time. AP

Need a job?

Maybe you want to learn how to create a résumé — or find out what to do or say in a job interview?

Then you might want to head to a job fair from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Thursday at the Great Commission Baptist Church, 7700 McCart Ave. in Fort Worth.

Companies attending the fair hope to hire at least 3,000 new employees, and likely more, at salaries ranging from $16 to $35 an hour, said Dale Allen, minister of evangelism at the church.

“There are job opportunities for entry level to executive level,” Allen said. “Some companies will hire on the spot.”

At least two dozen companies have confirmed that they will attend the fair, Allen said.

Those expected include Bell Helicopter, FedEx, Alcon, U.S. Postal Service, Martin Sprocket & Gear, Wells Fargo, the Fort Worth police department, the Dallas sheriff department, Six Flags Over Texas, Clayton Youth Enrichment, Albertsons, Tom Thumb and UPS.

This is the fifth year the church has sponsored this event.

Each year, around 600 to 800 applicants attend, Allen said.

Also at the fair, job seekers can learn how to boost résumés, improve interview skills and learn networking strategies, such as how to use social media to develop and strengthen relationships.

For more information about the job fair, call the church at 817-346-1869.

The church’s job fair comes as Lockheed Martin officials also plan a job fair for Sept. 17 at the Sheraton Fort Worth, 1701 Commerce St. The aeronautics company plans to hire between 400 and 1,000 new employees.

Lockheed is looking for workers with aerospace manufacturing or mechanical experience.

Anna Tinsley: 817-390-7610, @annatinsley

The defense contractor's second job fair in downtown Fort Worth drew long lines of people hoping to upgrade or gain employment in the manufacturing sector.

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