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Tyson Foods recalls about 3,000 pounds of chicken shipped to food service businesses

There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these recalled products.
There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these recalled products. U.S. Department of Agriculture

Tyson Foods Inc. has recalled about 3,120 pounds of frozen breaded chicken products that may be contaminated with blue and clear soft plastic, federal officials announced Friday.

The recalled items were shipped to food services establishments nationwide and are not available for purchase in retail stores, a news release from the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service stated.

The frozen, uncooked and breaded chicken tenderloins were produced on May 17, 2018.

The manufacturer has recalled its 12-pound boxes containing 3-pound plastic bags of uncooked, breaded, original chicken tenderloins with the lot code 1378NLR02. The recalled products are marked with the number “P-746” on the product package.

Tyson Foods told federal officials on Friday that their breading supplier was recalling the breading ingredients due to possible foreign material contamination. There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products, the release said.

Anyone concerned about an injury or illness from eating these products should contact a healthcare provider. Federal officials are concerned that some product may be frozen and in freezers at food service institutions and could be served.

Food service institutions that have purchased these products are urged to throw the products away and not serve them.

Consumers with food safety questions can "Ask Karen," the government's virtual representative available 24 hours a day at AskKaren.gov or via smartphone at m.askkaren.gov

Mitch Mitchell: 817-390-7752, @mitchmitchel3

There are reportedly less than 2,000 cases per year of listeria in the United States, but it has the highest fatality and hospitalization rates among food-borne illnesses.

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