Fort Worth

Selective Saturday rains hit North Side, North Tarrant the hardest

A full rainbow stretches across Fort Worth, as seen from downtown on Saturday. (Jagged curve of rainbow comes from in-camera panorama stitching.)
A full rainbow stretches across Fort Worth, as seen from downtown on Saturday. (Jagged curve of rainbow comes from in-camera panorama stitching.) Fort Worth Star-Telegram

High wind and rain tore across Tarrant County Saturday afternoon and evening ... or did it?

It depended, even more so than usual, on where one stood within the county.

Though DFW Airport saw just about a sixth of an inch of rain, according to the National Weather Service, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers facility near Grapevine Lake less than two miles away, got an inch.

Moving north and west along Texas 114 and East Loop 820, the Saturday rain totals grew larger and the recorded wind gusts became stronger. Watauga reportedly received 1.45 inches of rain, while the area surrounding the Tarrant/Denton County lines got nearly 1.3 inches, according to authorities.

Justin and Draper, formally known as Corral City, saw wind gusts approaching 55 miles per hour, the highest in the area. Within Fort Worth, the West Fork area (1.5 inches) and the North Side were hardest hit.

Quarter-size hail was reported around I-35 West and North Side Drive just after 6:30 p.m., and a pickup truck stuck in high water was reported near Northeast 28th Street shortly before that.

Most of the rain in the area let up around 7:30 p.m., when a severe thunderstorm warning for a large chunk of north Tarrant County expired.

The weather phenomenon of ice falling from the sky can cause tremendous property destruction. But how does hail form and what determines if it does in pea-sized chunks or in much larger, more damaging sizes? This video graphic explains.

Matthew Martinez: 817-390-7667, @MCTinez817

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